Support 100 years of independent journalism.

  1. Chart of the Day
9 November 2021

Why the world is still on course for climate catastrophe

Temperature modelling based solely on policies shows the world is set to warm by 2.7°C.

By Nick Ferris

The pledges announced to coincide with Cop26 – including net-zero promises from India, Saudi Arabia and Australia – mean global temperatures are now set to rise this century by 1.8°C, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA).

Since this figure is close to the 1.5°C level considered “safe” for the planet for climate change, it was celebrated in many quarters: IEA chief Fatih Birol described it as a “big step forward”.

But the IEA’s analysis is based only on long-term pledges, rather than the policies that will be needed to make those pledges a reality. 

A separate analysis of both policies and pledges by the think tank Climate Action Tracker (Cat) found that just 6 per cent of pledges are adequately supported by both policies and interim targets, which are usually for 2030. Cat further finds that, if we are to base temperature modelling solely on policies (ie, what is likely to happen), then the world is still on track for 2.7°C – warming that would be catastrophic. 

The authors of the report are scathing of the status quo, warning that “policy implementation on the ground is advancing at a snail’s pace”. They add that “there is a massive credibility, action and commitment gap that casts a long and dark shadow of doubt over the net zero goals put forward”. 

Select and enter your email address The New Statesman’s weekly environment email on the politics, business and culture of the climate and nature crises - in your inbox every Thursday.
  • Administration / Office
  • Arts and Culture
  • Board Member
  • Business / Corporate Services
  • Client / Customer Services
  • Communications
  • Construction, Works, Engineering
  • Education, Curriculum and Teaching
  • Environment, Conservation and NRM
  • Facility / Grounds Management and Maintenance
  • Finance Management
  • Health - Medical and Nursing Management
  • HR, Training and Organisational Development
  • Information and Communications Technology
  • Information Services, Statistics, Records, Archives
  • Infrastructure Management - Transport, Utilities
  • Legal Officers and Practitioners
  • Librarians and Library Management
  • Management
  • Marketing
  • OH&S, Risk Management
  • Operations Management
  • Planning, Policy, Strategy
  • Printing, Design, Publishing, Web
  • Projects, Programs and Advisors
  • Property, Assets and Fleet Management
  • Public Relations and Media
  • Purchasing and Procurement
  • Quality Management
  • Science and Technical Research and Development
  • Security and Law Enforcement
  • Service Delivery
  • Sport and Recreation
  • Travel, Accommodation, Tourism
  • Wellbeing, Community / Social Services
Visit our privacy Policy for more information about our services, how New Statesman Media Group may use, process and share your personal data, including information on your rights in respect of your personal data and how you can unsubscribe from future marketing communications.
THANK YOU

Content from our partners
Insurance: finding sustainable growth in stormy markets
Why public health policy needs to refocus
The five key tech areas for the public sector in 2023

Topics in this article: