Support 100 years of independent journalism.

  1. Politics
  2. Media
12 February 2013updated 26 Sep 2015 3:16pm

New Statesman announces record web traffic figures

NewStatesman.com is now Britain's biggest political website, with more than three million pageviews in the month of January.

By New Statesman

The New Statesman is now Britain’s biggest political website – just in time for the title’s centenary.

The New Statesman, founded in 1913, was the first British periodical to go online – all the way back in 1995. In the last four years, since its relaunch, the website’s traffic has risen sharply. It increased 231 per cent between the fourth quarter of 2009 and the first quarter of 2012.

Since then, traffic has risen another 44 per cent, and in January the site recorded 1.15 million monthly unique users and 3.35 million page impressions. 

This makes NewStatesman.com the country’s biggest political website, far outstripping rivals such as The Spectator (350,000 monthly unique users); ProspectIainDale.com (which recorded around 250,000 monthly uniques in the heyday of its previous incarnation); Political Scrapbook, Labour List, Conservative Home and Guido Fawkes (which recorded 117,494 visitors in the week ending 2 February, compared with the New Statesman‘s 243,937 uniques).

Sign up for The New Statesman’s newsletters Tick the boxes of the newsletters you would like to receive. Quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics from the New Statesman's politics team. The New Statesman’s global affairs newsletter, every Monday and Friday. The best of the New Statesman, delivered to your inbox every weekday morning. The New Statesman’s weekly environment email on the politics, business and culture of the climate and nature crises - in your inbox every Thursday. A handy, three-minute glance at the week ahead in companies, markets, regulation and investment, landing in your inbox every Monday morning. Our weekly culture newsletter – from books and art to pop culture and memes – sent every Friday. A weekly round-up of some of the best articles featured in the most recent issue of the New Statesman, sent each Saturday. A newsletter showcasing the finest writing from the ideas section and the NS archive, covering political ideas, philosophy, criticism and intellectual history - sent every Wednesday. Sign up to receive information regarding NS events, subscription offers & product updates.

The New Statesman‘s traffic growth has been driven by online-only scoops such as George Galloway’s comments on rape and reporting such as Helen Lewis’s investigation of the online abuse of blogger Anita Sarkeesian (with her initial blogs on the subject each attracting more than 160,000 views).

Content from our partners
How automation can help insurers keep pace with customer demand
How automation can help telecoms companies unlock their growth potential
The pandemic has had a scarring effect on loneliness, but we can do better

Alongside the site’s core – the unmissable Staggers blog, edited by George Eaton – there are a range of distinctive voices writing regular blogs. The NS online mixes investigative reporting – such as David Allen Green’s coverage of Julian Assange and the Nightjack case, and Alan White’s series on outsourcing, The Shadow State – with witty, irreverent and incisive social commentary from writers such as The Vagenda, Alex Andreou and Glosswitch. The site has carved out its own online identity, which complements the print magazine but is distinct from it. 

The New Statesman currently publishes all its magazine content online, free a week after print publication. Often, these pieces – such as Steven Poole’s essays on “neurobollocks” and “cyber-gurus“, or Jemima Khan’s piece on Wikileaks – attracted thousands of tweets, Facebook likes and other traffic through social networks such as StumbleUpon and Reddit. The New Statesman also recently launched a Tumblr page.