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So, Republican Senator Marco Rubio, how old IS the earth?

He's not a scientist, but he does know how to tell them when they're wrong.

By Alex Hern

GQ interviewed Marco Rubio, the junior Republican senator from Florida, former “crown prince of the Tea Party movement“, and runner-up in the race to be Mitt Romney’s vice-presidential candidate.

Marco Rubio does not have a firm grasp on reality.

GQ: How old do you think the Earth is? 

Marco Rubio: I’m not a scientist, man. I can tell you what recorded history says, I can tell you what the Bible says, but I think that’s a dispute amongst theologians and I think it has nothing to do with the gross domestic product or economic growth of the United States. I think the age of the universe has zero to do with how our economy is going to grow. I’m not a scientist. I don’t think I’m qualified to answer a question like that. At the end of the day, I think there are multiple theories out there on how the universe was created and I think this is a country where people should have the opportunity to teach them all. I think parents should be able to teach their kids what their faith says, what science says. Whether the Earth was created in 7 days, or 7 actual eras, I’m not sure we’ll ever be able to answer that. It’s one of the great mysteries.

 
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