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19 October 2016

Why did Julian Assange lose his internet connection?

Rumours of paedophilia have obscured the real reason the WikiLeaks founder has been cut off from the internet. 

By Amelia Tait

In the most newsworthy example of “My house, my rules” this year, Julian Assange’s dad (the Ecuadorian embassy in London) has cut off his internet because he’s been a bad boy. 

Rumours that the WikiLeaks‘ founder was WiFi-less were confirmed by Ecuador’s foreign ministry late last night, which released a statement saying it has “temporarily restricted access to part of its communications systems in its UK Embassy” where Assange has been granted asylum for the last four years. 

Claims that the embassy disconnected Assange because he had sent sexually explicit messages to an eight-year-old girl —first reported by the US political blog Daily Kos — have been quashed. Wikileaks responded by denying the claims on Twitter, as Ecuador explained the move was taken to prevent Assange’s interference with the US election. The decision follows the publication of leaked emails from Hillary Clinton’s campaign adviser John Podesta, as well as emails from the Democratic National Committee (DNC), by WikiLeaks.

Ecuador “respects the principle of non-intervention in the internal affairs of other states,” read the statement, though the embassy have confirmed they will continue to grant Assange asylum. 

Assange first arrived at the Ecuadorian embassy in London in June 2012, after being sought for questioning in Sweden over an allegation of rape, which he denies. WikiLeaks claims this new accusation is a further attempt to frame Assange.  “An unknown entity posing as an internet dating agency prepared an elaborate plot to falsely claim that Julian Assange received US$1M from the Russian government and a second plot to frame him sexually molesting an eight year old girl,” reads a news story on the official site.

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It is unclear when Assange will be reconnected, although it will presumably be after the US presidential election on 8 November.