The Returning Officer: money troubles in Windsor

In 1939, C S Edgerley was imprisoned for forgery relating to the purchase of elm trees.

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In 1918, the sitting Tory Ernest Gardner was opposed by C S Edgerley, who was described as a “government contractor”. He had applied for exemption from military service in 1916 and his case was adjourned “for further details relating to a badge”. According to the Reading Mercury, “He calls himself Labour-coalition unofficial.” In 1939, he was imprisoned for forgery relating to the purchase of elm trees. It was stated he had made £100,000 during the war, which he squandered.

In 1922 and 1923, the Liberal candidate was C B Crisp, the founder of the Anglo-Russian Trust. In 1912, he had arranged a loan to China despite official opposition. He left the Liberals in 1924 over their attitude to the government’s Russian trade treaty and stood for Labour.

Stephen Brasher

This article appears in the 06 May 2015 issue of the New Statesman, The Power Struggle