Support 100 years of independent journalism.

  1. Politics
24 October 2012

Cameron hasn’t created “a million“ private sector jobs

How the PM is misleading voters about the government's economic record.

By George Eaton

One of David Cameron’s favourite boasts is that “one million new jobs” have been created in the private sector since the coalition came to power. The claim appeared in his conference speech and he repeated it at today’s PMQs. It’s an impressive stat, cited by Cameron as proof that “our economy is rebalancing”. The problem, however, is that it’s not true.

The most recent figures from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) show that private sector employment has risen by 1.07 million in the two years since the coalition took office (the figures are for June 2010-June 2012), so, at first glance, Cameron’s claim might appear to be correct. But what the Prime Minister doesn’t want you to know is that a significant part of this increase was due to the reclassification of 196,000 further education and sixth form college teachers as private sector employees. As the ONS stated:

These educational bodies employed 196,000 people in March 2012 and the reclassification therefore results in a large fall in public sector employment and a corresponding large increase in private sector employment between March and June 2012.

If we strip out these 196,000 jobs, the increase in private sector employment is a less impressive 874,000.

Yet, far from correcting this error, Cameron compounded it by today boasting that there were a “million more people in work” than when Labour left office, a claim that takes no account of the 432,000 public sector jobs lost since June 2010 (who says there haven’t been cuts?). The true rise in employment is 462,000 (from 29,128,000 to 29,590,000), or 538,000 less than the figure used by Cameron.

Sign up for The New Statesman’s newsletters Tick the boxes of the newsletters you would like to receive. Quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics from the New Statesman's politics team. The best of the New Statesman, delivered to your inbox every weekday morning. The New Statesman’s global affairs newsletter, every Monday and Friday. A handy, three-minute glance at the week ahead in companies, markets, regulation and investment, landing in your inbox every Monday morning. Our weekly culture newsletter – from books and art to pop culture and memes – sent every Friday. A weekly round-up of some of the best articles featured in the most recent issue of the New Statesman, sent each Saturday. A weekly dig into the New Statesman’s archive of over 100 years of stellar and influential journalism, sent each Wednesday. Sign up to receive information regarding NS events, subscription offers & product updates.
I consent to New Statesman Media Group collecting my details provided via this form in accordance with the Privacy Policy

After complaining for years about Gordon Brown’s manipulation of economic statistics, the government came to power promising a new regime of transparency. But Cameron’s willful distortion of the facts on employment suggests he isn’t prepared to practice what he preached.