Support 100 years of independent journalism.

  1. Business
13 June 2012updated 22 Oct 2020 3:55pm

The “dog’s breakfast” that is City regulation

Mervyn King spends "more time..... talking about tennis" than about finance.

By Helen Roxburgh

Labour peers have rounded on the government this week over its Financial Services Bill, which will overhaul the way the City is regulated.

Opposition spokesman Lord Eatwell attacked the Bill as a “dog’s breakfast” which failed the  four tests of “accountability, clarity, efficiency and transparency.”

The Bill was receiving its second reading in the House of Lords yesterday. Lord Eatwell said that “instead of drafting a new template for the financial services industry” the government had constructed a “dog’s breakfast of amendments to earlier legislation”.

He promised to press for improvements to be made to the Bill, which he said was “flawed.”

Former City minister Lord Myners joined the criticism, claiming Bank chief Mervyn King spent more time in board meetings talking about tennis “than about issues of financial stability”.

Sign up for The New Statesman’s newsletters Tick the boxes of the newsletters you would like to receive. Quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics from the New Statesman's politics team. The New Statesman’s global affairs newsletter, every Monday and Friday. The best of the New Statesman, delivered to your inbox every weekday morning. A weekly round-up of The New Statesman's climate, environment and sustainability content. A handy, three-minute glance at the week ahead in companies, markets, regulation and investment, landing in your inbox every Monday morning. Our weekly culture newsletter – from books and art to pop culture and memes – sent every Friday. A weekly round-up of some of the best articles featured in the most recent issue of the New Statesman, sent each Saturday. A weekly dig into the New Statesman’s archive of over 100 years of stellar and influential journalism, sent each Wednesday. Sign up to receive information regarding NS events, subscription offers & product updates.

However, Lord Sassoon, Treasury minister, defended the Bill, saying that the current system had failed because “no one had the single responsibility to monitor the financial system”. The new legislation would put power firmly with the Bank of England, he said.

The Bill, which has completed its Commons stages, was carried over from the previous parliamentary session. It tears up the tripartite system of regulation where powers is shared between the Treasury, the Bank and the Financial Standards Authority.

Instead, a new Financial Policy Committee (FPC) within the Bank of England, will be tasked with monitoring systemic risks, while the Bill also creates a Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA) as a subsidiary of the Bank of England, and a Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) covering consumer protection.

Yesterday, it was announced that the outgoing chairman of KPMG, John Griffith-Jones, has been appointed as the first non-executive chair designate of the FCA.

Helen Roxburgh is the online editor of Economia