Support 100 years of independent journalism.

  1. Business
15 May 2012

Other people’s business, Tuesday 15 May.

JP Morgan and the politics of baby names.

By New Statesman

1. A set-to as old as the Old Testament, (Financial Times)

A five-alarm social media inferno was raging at Diageo, writes Andrew Hill.

2. Who’s going to pay to update Britain’s infrastructure? (Guardian)

Research from the RAC reckons the annual take from motoring taxation will drop by £13bn by 2029 while traffic will grow by 50 %, writes Dan Milmo.

3. The politics of…baby names (Washington Post)

Sign up for The New Statesman’s newsletters Tick the boxes of the newsletters you would like to receive. Quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics from the New Statesman's politics team. The best of the New Statesman, delivered to your inbox every weekday morning. The New Statesman’s global affairs newsletter, every Monday and Friday. A handy, three-minute glance at the week ahead in companies, markets, regulation and investment, landing in your inbox every Monday morning. Our weekly culture newsletter – from books and art to pop culture and memes – sent every Friday. A weekly round-up of some of the best articles featured in the most recent issue of the New Statesman, sent each Saturday. A weekly dig into the New Statesman’s archive of over 100 years of stellar and influential journalism, sent each Wednesday. Sign up to receive information regarding NS events, subscription offers & product updates.
I consent to New Statesman Media Group collecting my details provided via this form in accordance with the Privacy Policy

A split between blue and red states when it comes to baby-naming, writes Sarah Kliff.

4. J.P. Morgan’s woes cont. Damage control (Schumpeter)

A LARGE, mistaken, trading position take by J.P. Morgan, one of America’s leading banks, already costing it more than $2 billion has become a weapon in major battles in Washington and the financial markets, wrties Schumpeter.

5. Murky U.S. bribery law gets a dose of clarity (Reuters)

America’s murky bribery law is finally getting a dose of clarity, wrties Reynolds Holding.