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17 May 2012

Other people’s business, Thursday 17 May

Angry Birds and Gunk.

By New Statesman

1. In the era of Angry Birds, the challenge is finding the great things amid the junk (Washington Post

We’ve already determined that the world is flat, but the world is also starting to get more level, writes Joshua .

JPMorgan exposes the imperial CEO myth (Financial Times)

US shareholders have long tolerated a degree of dominance on the part of chief executives that would be untenable in London and elsewhere, writes John Gapper.

3.Law site’s IPO evokes a future beyond dying firms (Reuters)

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LegalZoom’s planned initial public offering evokes a future beyond dying law firms, writes Reynolds Holding.

4. Global sell-off could echo summer of 2011 (Reuters)

Global investors have been sucking money out of risk assets, writes Ian Campbell.

5. Ungunkable (Babbage)

When it comes to repelling gunk, Teflon and car wax are among the best materials available, writes Babbage.