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1 December 2011updated 26 Sep 2015 9:31pm

HIV is for life, not just World Aids Day

An HIV and health activist explains why he won't be wearing a red ribbon today.

By Will Nutland

It’s that time of year again. In the past week I’ve been asked to flash my red pants for Aids awareness (I don’t wear any); buy a fundraising red ribbon cupcake (I bake my own); and take part in a world-record-breaking HIV testing event in Soho (I had a test last month).

I’ll put bets on who will have the glitziest red ribbon brooch on X Factor on Saturday (Gary); I’ll guarantee (once again) that every well-meaning HIV exhibition where I work and study won’t show images of gay men (apart from the stock holding-hands-taken-from-behind photo); and it’ll be a sure-fire thing that a celebratory C-lister (probably white; probably straight; probably a woman) with a new single to sell will be the voice of HIV — but just for today…

Please excuse my cynicism: it’s World Aids Day again.

Despite the good news stories — and, for once in the 30-year history of HIV, there are many — once the red ribbons are packed away for another year (and there will be many more years), it will be business as usual. Business as usual for the millions of people throughout the world without access to HIV treatments; business as usual for the millions of people with no access to ways of preventing HIV or being tested for it; business as usual for the people with HIV, or at risk of acquiring it, who will continue to face stigma and discrimination; and business as usual for the millions of activists, educators, health workers and policy-makers around the world — many of whom are living with HIV themselves — for whom every day is “world Aids day”.

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Behind the fundraising events, the cake bake-offs and the world-record attempts lies the reality of many people with HIV or at risk of it. Despite the astonishing break-through in “new science” in the past two years, international funding for HIV treatment and prevention looks set to plummet as the Global Fund cuts funding for life-saving HIV treatment across Africa.

In the UK, new research from Sigma Research shows that Africans living with HIV face isolation and rely heavily on professional support services: the very health and social-care services that are at the forefront of cutbacks and budget constraints.

And data released this week from the Health Protection Agency shows that HIV diagnoses in gay and bisexual men in the UK are at the highest levels ever. Although some of the increase can be ascribed to recent drives to promote HIV testing (another of those good news stories), these data follow several years of cuts in local NHS funding to HIV prevention programmes for gay men. Last year the pan-London HIV prevention programme for gay men saw cuts of 20 per cent.

So, once again this year I won’t be wearing a red ribbon (and I acknowledge that for many other they serve as a symbol of remembrance), flashing my undies nor marking World Aids Day. Instead, I’ll be joining the millions of others around the world who research, lobby, campaign and educate around HIV. It’ll be a day like any other day: business as usual.

Will Nutland is a doctoral student researching the acceptability of pre-exposure HIV prophylaxis among gay men in London. He used to be head of health promotion at Terrence Higgins Trust

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