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22 September 2011

Cage-fighting kids? The real problem is the kneejerk reaction

Why bother with putting things into context when you can just point and screech?

By Steve Baxter

What is it about the story of “cagefighting kids” is it that we find so shocking? Is it the kids-as-entertainment aspect? Is it the fighting? Is it the age of the participants? Or is it the cage?

Perhaps what’s needed here is a way of learning self-defence against a kneejerk — it’s a particularly brutal weapon, when used by an advanced practitioner like the Daily Mirror or the Metro, and fans of martial arts have found themselves on the defensive thanks to headlines like CAGE OF INNOCENTS or CHILD CAGE FIGHTERS. How do you block it? And is there some way of sending in a counterpunch?

Gareth A Davies, the Telegraph‘s expert on combat sports, shows the value in speaking to experts who actually know what they’re talking about. He points out that it was not mixed martial arts taking place in the arena, but jujitsu; and while he condemns the setting, he is irritated by the moral outrage. “Take away the cage, the ring card girls, and put a gi on the boys, and there would have been no interest in the news pages in this story. What it is not — is mixed martial arts,” he says.

Is that needless hair-splitting? I don’t think it is. These weren’t children punching and kicking each other in a free-for-all. They were taking part in an exercise with strict rules. Whether you think that’s suitable entertainment for an adult audience — some of whom had been drinking, the Mirror tells us in a somewhat pearl-clutching tone — is up to you. Perhaps there’s something, also, about the cage that makes it seem sordid, or wrong. Not that the cage was involved in any way other than to mark the boundaries of the arena, as far as the children were concerned.

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Mixed martial artist Rosi Sexton, meanwhile, aims to set the record straight. “As it turns out, one of the boys and his parents are good friends of mine. He’s a great kid — polite, well mannered and dedicated to his sport. His parents are also wonderful people, totally devoted to their son and very upset at the way this is being portrayed,” she writes. But is anyone listening?

As ever, though, a bit of context from an expert like that does tend to take the edge off a good tale, doesn’t it? Why bother with putting things into context, or explaining the value of combat, self-defence or martial arts to children, when you can just point and screech? KIDS IN A CAGE! Shock! Outrage! CHILD CAGE FIGHTERS! Get angry now!

What that approach does, though, is to dehumanise the participants somewhat. Those are real children in that arena, with families who love them and care for them, no doubt. They’re not out vandalising or causing trouble; they’re involved in something which requires discipline and hard endeavour in order to bring a reward. Have we heard from the parents of the boys involved? Do we want to? Do we care what they have to say — or are we just keen to be outraged and upset by what we see, or what we think we see, that it doesn’t matter what’s actually there?

We see what we want to see, and it seems we’re keen to be outraged. But behind the anger and the fury, the real stories are a little less sensational than we’re led to believe. If you’re going to get angry, at least get it right about why. Otherwise it’s just shadow-boxing.