New Times,
New Thinking.

  1. Politics
11 May 2011

Clegg pours cold water on Cable’s “progressive majority”

The Lib Dem leader dismisses those who “still dream of a progressive alliance”.

By George Eaton

It is somehow typical of Nick Clegg’s fate that a speech ostensibly designed to distance himself from David Cameron has already been defined by the phrase “muscular liberalism“. After all, it was that same clunky label which Cameron used to describe his approach to multiculturalism in the speech that angered so many in Clegg’s party.

Based on the extracts I’ve seen, the Lib Dem leader’s address on “The Coalition and Liberal Politics” will be dominated by the argument that the coaliton is one of “necessity, not of conviction”, a temporary alliance rather than an ideological union.

He will say:

There has also been some talk of a so-called centre-right “realignment” since the formation of the current coalition. This is just nonsensical and naive. As I said earlier, this is a coalition of necessity, not of conviction. Realignment consists in practice of two-party political system continued by other means. It is a polite euphemism used by people who want to continue the fight between one gang and the other gang – with us as a temporary recruit to one side. I didn’t come into politics to simply replicate the two-party system under the guise of realignment. That’s not my definition of pluralism.

Select and enter your email address Your weekly guide to the best writing on ideas, politics, books and culture every Saturday. The best way to sign up for The Saturday Read is via saturdayread.substack.com The New Statesman's quick and essential guide to the news and politics of the day. The best way to sign up for Morning Call is via morningcall.substack.com
  • Administration / Office
  • Arts and Culture
  • Board Member
  • Business / Corporate Services
  • Client / Customer Services
  • Communications
  • Construction, Works, Engineering
  • Education, Curriculum and Teaching
  • Environment, Conservation and NRM
  • Facility / Grounds Management and Maintenance
  • Finance Management
  • Health - Medical and Nursing Management
  • HR, Training and Organisational Development
  • Information and Communications Technology
  • Information Services, Statistics, Records, Archives
  • Infrastructure Management - Transport, Utilities
  • Legal Officers and Practitioners
  • Librarians and Library Management
  • Management
  • Marketing
  • OH&S, Risk Management
  • Operations Management
  • Planning, Policy, Strategy
  • Printing, Design, Publishing, Web
  • Projects, Programs and Advisors
  • Property, Assets and Fleet Management
  • Public Relations and Media
  • Purchasing and Procurement
  • Quality Management
  • Science and Technical Research and Development
  • Security and Law Enforcement
  • Service Delivery
  • Sport and Recreation
  • Travel, Accommodation, Tourism
  • Wellbeing, Community / Social Services
Visit our privacy Policy for more information about our services, how Progressive Media Investments may use, process and share your personal data, including information on your rights in respect of your personal data and how you can unsubscribe from future marketing communications.
THANK YOU

Yet the difficulty for Clegg is that, like Cameron, he has frequently given the impression that he is happier sharing power with the Conservatives than he would be governing alone. The foreword to the coalition agreement, for instance, declared:

We have found that a combination of our parties’ best ideas and attitudes has produced a programme for government that is more radical and comprehensive than our individual manifestos.

All the same, it’s safe to conclude that we won’t see a Tory-Lib Dem pact or anything like it at the next general election. But perhaps the most notable thing about Clegg’s speech is the scepticism, and even contempt, with which he treats the idea of a “progressive alliance”.

“There are still those who dream of a so-called ‘progressive alliance’,” he will say, “forgetting that Labour had 13 years to make some moves in that direction and never quite seemed to get around to it until, in desperation, they tried to cling to power last year.”

That’s a none-too-subtle rebuke to those such as Vince Cable and Chris Huhne who boasted that the adoption of the Alternative Vote would finally make the dream of a “progressive majority” a reality. It’s also yet more evidence that Clegg is in no mood to forge the roots of a future alliance with Labour.

The Liberal Democrats, he insists, will stand their ground “in the liberal centre of British politics”, neither the “anti-Tory party [nor] the anti-Labour pary”. Once more, there is an obvious contrast with Cable, who argued that AV would prevent another Conservative century.

It’s a bold declaration by Clegg and one, you feel, that won’t do his potential challengers on the left any harm.

Content from our partners
An innovative approach to regional equity
ADHD in the criminal justice system: a case for change – with Takeda
The power of place in tackling climate change