Support 100 years of independent journalism.

  1. Politics
21 January 2011

The sadness of Alan Johnson’s resignation

As my experience with Paddy Ashdown taught me, politics needs people with messy lives.

By Olly Grender

Sometimes I wish we were French. I wish that we were not raised on the false morality of Carry On Camping. Instead, I wish we lived in a country where someone deeply human like Alan Johnson didn’t feel he had to resign because of sex. Where William Hague doesn’t have to write about infertility and where marriage remains a strictly private matter between two individuals.

The first really difficult media issue I ever dealt with was when Paddy Ashdown spoke publicly about his extramarital affair in 1992. At the time, as a naive press officer, I was genuinely surprised when journalists asked me whether or not he was going to resign. It just hadn’t occurred to me that he needed to. For me, his politics had not changed, his leadership had not changed.

All the senior men in the party hid, quite literally, in their offices. We were getting slaughtered on air with no one to talk for the party. I sent a grovelling message to the elderly Baroness Nancy Seear, Economist, Titan, Good Egg, who stormed into the press office and announced loudly, in her best Margaret Rutherford tones: “My dear, I have a past and I don’t know many people who don’t. Now, which studio do you want me to go into first?”

No doubt the Sunday papers will be full to the brim with the kind of stuff that belongs in Coronation Street and EastEnders, rather than parliament. But there will be few revelations that would convince me that Johnson had to go.

Select and enter your email address Quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics from the New Statesman's politics team. A weekly newsletter helping you fit together the pieces of the global economic slowdown. The New Statesman’s global affairs newsletter, every Monday and Friday. The New Statesman’s weekly environment email on the politics, business and culture of the climate and nature crises - in your inbox every Thursday. Our weekly culture newsletter – from books and art to pop culture and memes – sent every Friday. A weekly round-up of some of the best articles featured in the most recent issue of the New Statesman, sent each Saturday. A newsletter showcasing the finest writing from the ideas section and the NS archive, covering political ideas, philosophy, criticism and intellectual history - sent every Wednesday. Sign up to receive information regarding NS events, subscription offers & product updates.
  • Administration / Office
  • Arts and Culture
  • Board Member
  • Business / Corporate Services
  • Client / Customer Services
  • Communications
  • Construction, Works, Engineering
  • Education, Curriculum and Teaching
  • Environment, Conservation and NRM
  • Facility / Grounds Management and Maintenance
  • Finance Management
  • Health - Medical and Nursing Management
  • HR, Training and Organisational Development
  • Information and Communications Technology
  • Information Services, Statistics, Records, Archives
  • Infrastructure Management - Transport, Utilities
  • Legal Officers and Practitioners
  • Librarians and Library Management
  • Management
  • Marketing
  • OH&S, Risk Management
  • Operations Management
  • Planning, Policy, Strategy
  • Printing, Design, Publishing, Web
  • Projects, Programs and Advisors
  • Property, Assets and Fleet Management
  • Public Relations and Media
  • Purchasing and Procurement
  • Quality Management
  • Science and Technical Research and Development
  • Security and Law Enforcement
  • Service Delivery
  • Sport and Recreation
  • Travel, Accommodation, Tourism
  • Wellbeing, Community / Social Services
Visit our privacy Policy for more information about our services, how New Statesman Media Group may use, process and share your personal data, including information on your rights in respect of your personal data and how you can unsubscribe from future marketing communications.

If, on the other hand, this was the moment, he felt, to get away from the poison whispering campaign regarding his competence on the economy from his own side, well, that I would understand.

I think people have messy lives; many journalists, many politicians and many voters. Politics needs people with messy lives, politics needs people like Nancy Seear and Alan Johnson. No one should have to resign because of that.