Support 100 years of independent journalism.

  1. Politics
3 January 2011

100 days of Ed Miliband: the defining moments

The key points from Miliband’s first 100 days as Labour leader.

By George Eaton

Best moment: Miliband’s clear and persuasive opposition to the abolition of universal child benefit. It ensured that his first PMQs was a success and allowed him to assert his social-democratic credentials. With the Treasury warning that the planned benefit cuts are “unenforceable“, Miliband’s opposition may yet pay dividends.

Worst moment: The Labour leader was humiliated when David Cameron declared: “I’d rather be a child of Thatcher than a son of Brown.” It was the defining moment of what proved to be his worst week as leader.

Best line: “I was a student politician, but I wasn’t hanging around with people who were throwing bread rolls and wrecking restaurants.” (To David Cameron at PMQs on 8 December)

Worst line: “I think I was doing something else at the time, actually.” (On why he missed the students’ protest)

Sign up for The New Statesman’s newsletters Tick the boxes of the newsletters you would like to receive. Quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics from the New Statesman's politics team. The best of the New Statesman, delivered to your inbox every weekday morning. The New Statesman’s global affairs newsletter, every Monday and Friday. A handy, three-minute glance at the week ahead in companies, markets, regulation and investment, landing in your inbox every Monday morning. Our weekly culture newsletter – from books and art to pop culture and memes – sent every Friday. A weekly round-up of some of the best articles featured in the most recent issue of the New Statesman, sent each Saturday. A weekly dig into the New Statesman’s archive of over 100 years of stellar and influential journalism, sent each Wednesday. Sign up to receive information regarding NS events, subscription offers & product updates.
I consent to New Statesman Media Group collecting my details provided via this form in accordance with the Privacy Policy

Best joke: “If the Kremlin is spying on the Lib Dems, I’m not surprised. They want a bit of light relief.” (At PMQs in response to the Mike Hancock story)

Worst joke: “I stole David’s football, so he nationalised my train set.” (In his party conference speech)

Least loyal shadow minister: Alan Johnson wins this one by a country mile. His sustained opposition to a graduate tax and to a permanent 50p income-tax rate represented the most serious challenge to Miliband’s authority. The shadow chancellor eventually climbed down and suggested that there was a “strong case” for graduate tax, albeit in the most unconvincing way possible. But the damage had been done and the confusion meant Labour could offer only token opposition to higher tuition fees.

Highest Labour poll rating: 43 per cent (YouGov/Sun poll, 20 December)

Lowest Labour poll rating: 34 per cent (ComRes/Independent on Sunday, 15 October)

And finally . . . Best line borrowed from an NS comment thread: “He wished he could come back and say No, No No, but in his case it’s a bit more like No, Maybe, Oh go on then.” (On David Cameron and the EU budget. Hats off to Bill Kristol-Balls)