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5 October 2010updated 27 Sep 2015 2:11am

Conference 2010 Lookahead | Tuesday 5 October

The who, when and where of today's Conservative party conference.

By Caroline Crampton

Look out for

Today’s big speech will be from Iain Duncan Smith this afternoon at 14:30. Following George Osborne’s announcement yesterday that universal child benefit would be cut, he will be under pressure to articulate his plan for the future of the entire benefit system. Critics of the child benefit cut, including from within the Conservative Party and the right-wing media, have called for the cut to be “softened”, so Duncan Smith’s response today will be closely scrutinised for signs of this.

In addition, David Cameron hinted in an interview this morning that child benefit would not be included in the planned “universal credit”, as it would be tantamount to a “means testing system for every single family in the country”, where as Iain Duncan Smith has previously suggested that child benefit would be part of the universal credit.

Signs of trouble

Justice Secretary Ken Clarke, due to speak this morning, could be a source of concern for coalition operatives — always unpredictable, this weekend he went on record to register his concern that Britain could be heading for a double-dip recession, striking a pessimistic note ahead of a conference at which the Tories will be striving to strike an optimistic note.

In addition to his economic pronouncements, the former chancellor will use his conference speech today to announce new plans to create jobs for prisoners. He is expected to announce plans to involve private companies in creating jobs for prisoners, and perhaps even the creation of special “workplace prisons”. Tory grassroots are already reported to be unhappy with Clarke’s previous announcements that rehabilitation and community sentences will be used to ease the burden on prisons, and today’s speech, with its rhetoric about jails providing “a regime of hard work”, will be an attempt by Clarke to appease his critics within his own party.

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On the fringe

The New Statesman hosts a panel discussion, chaired by Mehdi Hasan, entitled Gaza life support: Is aid a failure of politics?, with Alan Duncan MP, Robin Kealy from Medical Aid to Palestine, NS contributor Ed Platt, and Chris Doyle, director of the Council for Arab-British Understanding. 1pm, Cullinan Suite, Copthorne Hotel.

Elsewhere, David Davis MP, Alex Deane of Big Brother Watch, and Matthew Elliott, founder of the Taxpayers’ Alliance and campaign director for the No2AV campaign, come together for an event entitled Civil Liberties under the Coalition. 3.15pm, Austin Court.

Today’s agenda

10:00 Public services – Andrew Lansley and Michael Gove

11.30 Cutting crime, reforming justice – Ken Clarke and Theresa May

14.30 Reforming welfare – Iain Duncan Smith

15.45 Tackling global poverty – Andrew Mitchell