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23 September 2010

Laurie Penny: The use of “curvy“ models is hardly progress

This does not make it one jot easier for troubled young women to live in our own skin.

By Laurie Penny

This fall, the fashion press is celebrating ‘the return of curves’. With London Fashion Week in full swing, designers and photographers are congratulating themselves on what has been dubbed a ‘catwalk revolution’, amounting to a handful of models weighing up to 170 pounds featuring on a handful of runways, the feting of designers like Erdem Moralioglu who occasionally make dresses in a size 16, and the paparazzi mobbing poor, expansively-bosomed Christina Hendricks every time she gets out of a taxi.

‘Curves’, it appears, are back in style. This means that women whose skeletons are less than entirely visible through their skin will now be permitted to doff our sackloths of shame and go to parties with fashion people. Well, roll up the banners, ladies, and put away the placards: it’s the greatest achievement for feminism since equal pay.

It is rather a sad indictment of the scope and ambition of the modern women’s movement that the limited return of ‘curves’ to the fashion zeitgeist is being treated as serious progress. In case anyone hadn’t noticed, meaningful social revolutions do not tend to happen on the catwalk. The last style ‘revolution’ was the re-introduction of jodhpurs to the fashion-forward female’s aspirational wardrobe in the terrible autumn of 2008, and we all know how that ended. Feminism has come so far, it seems, that we’re now supposed to be grateful that fashion editors have graciously allowed a few models to appear in public with one or even two obscene spare inches of subcutaneous fat.

This particular runway revolution has an element of the freak show about it. Roll up, the press seems to be hollering, roll up and see the amazing meal-eating women! Besides previewing the socks, skirts and unlikely headdresses that are going to be in style in 2011, the circus of Fashion Week also showcases what type of woman will be in vogue next season, and oddly enough, this year’s on-trend female looks surprisingly similar to the identikit models who crowded the runways at Fashion Week last year: she is young, white, slender, pretty, fragile, obedient and silent.

Used by fashion editors and PRs, the word ‘curves’ smacks offensively of euphemistic posturing. In today’s post-watershed world, where you can stream five channels of hardcore coprophilia over your cornflakes at breakfast, why is female flesh still so horrifying that we still have to have a polite euphemism for it? ‘Curves’, in fact, have always existed – as, for that matter, have love handles, cellulite, scars, dimples, fat thighs, chunky calves, bad hair, broad shoulders, big boobs, round arses and turkey necks. Shocking though it might sound, women with these ghastly personal attributes have just as much right to self-esteem and social status as young, beautiful catwalk models.

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In this context, getting excited about the ‘return’ of curves is just one more way of obsessively scrutinising women’s bodies, fetishising female flesh and particularly female fat as somehow shocking, abnormal, edgy. Female fat is not edgy. It’s not an unusual fashion trend. It’s everyday reality for over three billion human beings on this planet. I’m sitting in nine and a half stone of it right now, and let me tell you, it’s gloriously mundane.

It wasn’t always like this. Not so long ago I was easily as scrawny as a catwalk model, because I happened to be in the grip of a life-threatening eating disorder that stole five years of my youth and caused my family and friends no small amount of unnecessary heartbreak. As a recovered anorexic, I’m supposed to be particularly pleased that ‘curves’ are back in style, given that everyone knows little girls only get eating disorders because their brains overheat from looking at too many fashion magazines, and not because of any sort of unrelenting social pressure on women of all ages to work harder, look prettier and take up as little space as possible.

Take it from me: noticing a few extra inches of fat on the relentless images of silent, costly feminine perfection that bombard us every day does not make it one jot easier for troubled young women to live in our own skin. The things that make a difference are things that cannot be sold, or advertised, or crammed into a gushing press release. They are simple things, like time and patience, love and security, tolerance and respect; vital things, like understanding that adult sexuality isn’t just about submission and servility, like believing that what we do and who we are might be more important than what we look like. That type of personal and political revolution is something that the fashion industry, with its inability to imagine women who are not silent commodities or faceless consumers, will never be able to deliver.