Support 100 years of independent journalism.

  1. Politics
26 March 2010

How Labour has redistributed from rich to poor

New data shows how tax changes have benefited the poorest 10 per cent.

By George Eaton

Robin Cook was always fond of hailing Tony Blair’s Labour government as the most redistributive since Lloyd George, and now here’s the data to prove it.

The graph below, from the Institute for Fiscal Studies, shows how New Labour’s tax and benefits changes have redistributed wealth from the poorest to the richest since 1997.

Distributional-impact-Labour-1024x723

Under Labour, the poorest 10 per cent of households have gained by 13 per cent, while the richest 10 per cent have lost by almost 9 per cent.

Sign up for The New Statesman’s newsletters Tick the boxes of the newsletters you would like to receive. Quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics from the New Statesman's politics team. The best of the New Statesman, delivered to your inbox every weekday morning. The New Statesman’s global affairs newsletter, every Monday and Friday. A handy, three-minute glance at the week ahead in companies, markets, regulation and investment, landing in your inbox every Monday morning. Our weekly culture newsletter – from books and art to pop culture and memes – sent every Friday. A weekly round-up of some of the best articles featured in the most recent issue of the New Statesman, sent each Saturday. A weekly dig into the New Statesman’s archive of over 100 years of stellar and influential journalism, sent each Wednesday. Sign up to receive information regarding NS events, subscription offers & product updates.
I consent to New Statesman Media Group collecting my details provided via this form in accordance with the Privacy Policy

With the Tories still committed to their grossly regressive plan to raise the inheritance-tax threshold to £1m and the Lib Dems’ tax plans likely to widen income inequality, it’s clear that only Labour can be trusted to combine redistribution with growth.

The party’s deficit reduction plan, based on a ratio of 67 per cent spending cuts to 33 per cent tax rises, is also the most progressive.

The Tories plan to reduce the deficit through an 80:20 mix of cuts and taxes, while the Lib Dems, as Nick Clegg boasted to the Spectator, plan to do so through spending cuts alone.

Follow the NS team on Facebook.