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27 March 2012updated 26 Sep 2015 8:02pm

Opinionomics | 27 March 2012

Must read analysis and comment

By Alex Hern

1. Bernanke, Bullard, and QE3 (Economist’s View: Fed Watch)

Tim Duy looks at whether we can read into Bernanke’s comments an acknowledgement of a third round of quantitative easing.

2. At the Frontier of Personalized Medicine (Marginal Revolution)

Alex Tabarrok uses an example from the cutting edge of medical science to argue that the future for a lot of industries is “big data” – so hire an economist!

3. Japanese economy: A glimmer of growth (Financial Times)

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Mure Dickie reports on the state of Japan.

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4. Strange bedfellows: Gretchen Morgenson and Patrick Byrne (Reuters)

Felix Salmon argues that the focus on Goldman Sachs is on the wrong thing. They probably weren’t naked shorting – but does that matter?

5. Those cautious central bankers (Free Exchange)

“Central bankers seem most interested in crafting arguments that will allow them to do as little as possible,” writes Ryan Avent