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12 February 2010

Jostling for Geoff Hoon’s seat

Candidate confirms he will run for the Notts seat.

By James Macintyre

No sooner has the news that Geoff Hoon is to step down from the Commons at the next election — perhaps in the wake of his role in the “coup that never was” last month — than speculation has kicked off as to who might take up the Labour candidacy in Ashfield, Notts.

Paul Waugh reports:

I’m told the names in the frame are John Knight, the leader of Ashfield District Council, and former Hoon special adviser James Connal.

Connal, a canny lad, raised eyebrows when he rented a flat in Sutton-in-Ashfield. Not the sort of place you’d normally find a suave, London-based lobbyist. But it is smack in the constituency of his former boss.

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Mr Connal appears to have been in close contact with some activists locally, particularly as the calls increased for Hoon to be deselected. The fact that he has worked with private equity firms may or may not appeal to the local members.

But another name that is bound to figure on any speculative shortlist is Michael Dugher, another former special adviser to Hoon. Dugher is currently the Prime Minister’s Chief Political Spokesman. He grew up in Edlington, a pit village nearby. Could his arm be twisted into quitting No 10 and going for Ashfield?

Interesting. Certainly Michael Dugher is Labour MP material, and rumour has it that he has been promised a seat by the party leadership. He narrowly missed out on his home town of Doncaster to Ed Miliband in 2005.

Having — paradoxically — previously worked hard as special adviser for Hoon, who would later emerge as a plotter against Gordon Brown, Dugher has since impressed key people in No 10. Will he go up against his former colleage from Hoon’s office, though?

James Connal, when I call following Waugh’s blog, confirms to me that he will indeed be standing for the seat, though he is characteristically modest. “I’m going for it, but of course it’s up to Labour’s NEC as to whether I’m on the shortlist,” he says.

But: “I live there. I am an elected member of my local Labour Party branch and have been going up there assiduously for the past year. I know a lot of the party members and I think we need to pull together to beat the Lib Dems and the Conservatives.”

Fighting talk from a man who has found himself the subject of an ominous mini-smear campaign in recent days, including being described as “baby-faced” and worse in the gossip columns.

In fact, Connal is an old head on young shoulders, with impressive socially conscious credentials, having run the Save the Children child poverty campaign in the run-up to the Budget, and who now — post-government — currently provides advice to the Georgian government.

Doubtless, Dugher deserves a seat, too. But Connal is clearly going to go for it in Ashfield. It would be a shame if room could not be found on Labour’s list for both of these rather different, but equally worthy former colleagues and friends.

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