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Ben Stiller is Anthony Scaramucci: casting the inevitable Donald Trump movie

Once you see it, you can’t unsee it.

With every passing day, American politics feels increasingly like the farcical movie it will, inevitably, be turned into one day – who needs artistic licence when you have Kremlingate, press secretaries replaced faster than Spiderman actors an– oh God, is this really real life, how is this happening?!

Anyway, here are the people we’d cast in Donald Trump: The Movie.

Donald Trump – Jon Voight

There are so many people that come to mind as Trump – Alec Baldwin, Martin Sheen, a hologram of Philip Seymour Hoffman, but it feels like a just punishment for Trump supporter Jon Voight to have to play out all of Trump’s catastrophic mistakes on the big screen. Plus, that leads us to…

Melania Trump – Angelina Jolie

Tell me this double casting wouldn’t be perfectly creepy and disgusting.

Ivanka Trump – Jennifer Lawrence

Once you see it, you can’t unsee it.

Jared Kushner – Paul Dano

We know that Dano can do simpering and creepy – plus they have the exact same lip-to-face ratio!

Eric Trump – Jonah Hill

With Tom Felton as a close second.

Barron Trump – Jacob Tremblay

They’re the same age, have a definite physical resemblance – and Tremblay has previously appeared in a film where a small cute child finds himself trapped by his father in a hellish misogynistic nightmare.

Anthony Scaramucci – Ben Stiller

That Zoolander pout and that well-practiced look of hurt shock will come extremely in handy in this role.

Sean Spicer – Melissa McCarthy

Because how could it be anyone else?

Steve Bannon – Timothy Spall

He’ll have to regain the weight he lost – but he’s perfect.

Hillary Clinton – Meryl Streep

Just, obviously.

Kellyanne Conway...

Patrick Stewart.

Anna Leszkiewicz is the New Statesman's deputy culture editor.

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​The US and the EU are shaky allies in Theresa May’s stand-off with Russia

Both Donald Trump and Jean-Claude Juncker undermined the PM by congratulating President Putin on his re-election.

With friends like these, who needs Vladimir Putin? Jean-Claude Juncker and Donald Trump have both undermined Theresa May's attempt at a united front against the Kremlin, as both men congratulated the president on his successful re-election.

The Washington Post has the remarkable details of the Trump-Putin phone call, in which the American President ignored a note saying “DO NOT CONGRATULATE” and neglected a briefing note instructing him to condemn the nerve agent attack on the Skripals. You can read the full letter from Juncker to Putin here. In both cases, what's in the message is fairly ordinary: the offence is one of omission.

How much does it matter as far May's stand-off with the Russian government goes? The difference is that Trump's position matters because he has hard power: it is a result of his Russia position that American sanctions and rhetoric about the attack on the Skripals is not tougher. Juncker's position matters because – while he has been condemned by Donald Tusk, Guy Verhofstadt and large numbers of MEPs – he is representative of a significant strain of public opinion across Europe.

We were given a measure of the size of that caucus in Germany, with polls showing that in excess of 80 per cent of Germans have an unfavourable opinion of Donald Trump, but just over half say the same of Vladimir Putin. In the United Kingdom, one of the EU's more hawkish nations outside the Russian-EU frontier, voters, also have a more unfavourable opinion of Trump (80 per cent) than of Putin (74 per cent). 

Bluntly, the problem May has is that the present incumbent of the White House is a shaky ally and most European politicians, including herself, have electorates who are potentially flaky too. Should Sergey Lavrov's threat that further sanctions will invite further reprisals be made good on, it's not a good starting point for the prime minister.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman and the PSA's Journalist of the Year. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.