Emma Stone and Colin Firth.
Magic in the Moolight: Another year, another Woody Allen mediocrity
By Ryan Gilbey - 18 September 17:50

It is astonishing, with actors as gifted as Colin Firth and Emma Stone, that Woody Allen’s latest film so badly misses the mark.

“The Riot Club” is based on Laura Wade’s Bullingdon Club-inspired Royal Court play “Posh”.
If only the lads of The Riot Club were a little less revolting
By Ryan Gilbey - 18 September 13:07

Lone Scherfig’s film adaptation of the 2010 play Posh feels unbalanced: we want to see a bit of naughty fun before the nastiness kicks in.

“The Riot Club” is based on Laura Wade’s Bullingdon Club-based Royal Court play “Posh”.
The Riot Club’s portrayal of a restaurant-smashing Oxbridge elite lacks political bite
By Conrad Landin - 12 September 15:52

The film, adapted from Laura Wade’s Bullingdon Club-based play Posh, fails to address the fact that it isn’t just the restaurant-smashers who benefit from Oxbridge elitism.

Strike partners: marching for the miners in Pride
Glitter and grit: when gay rights activists allied with the miners
By Ryan Gilbey - 12 September 10:18

Pride takes a subject that might be considered earnest or marginal and smuggles it through in jazzy, feel-good colours.

The great contender: Brando at his parents' home in Illinois in 1951. Photo: Art Shay/The Life Images Collection/Getty
Marlon fishing: was Brando really brain as well as brawn?
By Christopher Bray - 11 September 10:00

Susan Mizruchi considers Brando a kind of one-man UN. Alas, she also unwittingly demonstrates how elitist and dictatorial her putative freedom fighter could be.

A reprisal of The Last House on the Left shows 35mm film is not dead yet
By Alexander Woolley - 08 September 15:00

Hollywood is scaling back on analogue film, but in the UK dedicated fans are organising screenings in 35mm to try and keep the medium alive.

Reel deal: the old-style American drive-in has become a relic and may soon disappear
That’s all, folks: what the end of 35mm film means for cinema
By Helen Alexander and Rhys Blakely - 08 September 10:00

Like all things human, the 35mm reel is slowly shuffling off this mortal coil. This year, Paramount Pictures became the first big studio to announce that it would no longer release 35mm prints of movies in the US.

In The Basement.
2014 London Film Festival preview: French house music, Austrian basements and the British Harmony Korine
By Ryan Gilbey - 05 September 12:17

Our film critic Ryan Gilbey previews the 58th London Film Festival, which opens next month.

Not fade away: Philip Seymour Hoffman
Mark Lawson: The posthumous films of Philip Seymour Hoffman and Robin Williams
By Mark Lawson - 04 September 17:21

The problem is that film is a form of immortality but it is disturbing if we see the ghost too soon or with scars that remind us of their departure. 

Stranger at the door: Dan Stevens as David
Downton to downright nasty: Dan Stevens’s dramatic transformation
By Ryan Gilbey - 04 September 16:46

In The Guest, Stevens plays David, a stranger who pitches up on the doorstep of a grieving American family. He claims to be a friend of their eldest son, who died in combat in Afghanistan but it’s clear to the viewer he’s bad news. 

Eva Green.
Beaten to a pulp: Why the hyper-stylised Sin City is in need of Raymond Chandler
By Ryan Gilbey - 29 August 10:00

Sin City: A Dame to Kill For imagines what 1940s cinema might have looked like with CGI and no Hays Code - but it falls short of that era’s crackling dialogue, smoky characters and emotional pull.

Dogfight proves that a famous name is not the only reason to adapt a film for the stage
By Ryan Gilbey - 28 August 15:15

Dogfight at the Southwark Playhouse shows that a musical using an existing film as its springboard is no more or less likely to succeed than an entirely original work. And rightly so.

Night Moves.
Night Moves: an environmental thriller with an intractable problem at its core
By Ryan Gilbey - 26 August 10:30

Jesse Eisenberg and Dakota Fanning star as eco-warriors in Kelly Reichardt’s tense new film, two radicals who plan to blow up a hydroelectric dam.

It's only a movie: horror films may claim cultural relevance but their main appeal is shock or terror
Blood money: how the market affects what horror makes it to Hollywood
By Yo Zushi - 22 August 12:13

Recent torture pornographers such as Eli Roth arguably have aligned themselves with 1970s American horror auteurs not only to legitimise their work but to cash in on their rebel credibility.

Hocus pocus: props on the Harry Potter set at the Warner Bros Studio Tour London. Photo: Gettty
Magic effect: how Harry Potter has influenced the political values of the Millennial generation
By Anthony Gierzynski - 19 August 10:56

Reading the books correlated with higher political tolerance, less predisposition to authoritarianism, greater support for equality, and greater opposition to the use of violence and torture.

Get your geek on: crowds on the way into San Diego Comic-Con 2013. Photo: Getty
Where’s Wonder Woman? How comic book diversity has failed to translate to the big screen
By Karen Yossman - 18 August 16:38

With over 75 years of history, comics boast a multitude of inspirational female, black and even disabled characters. Superman is, at its heart, an immigrant tale, while X-Men is an allegory of the fight against fascism. 

The Rover.
Sun, sand and sadism: The Rover by David Michôd
By Ryan Gilbey - 15 August 11:00

Guy Pearce and Robert Pattinson star in David Michôd’s distopian thriller The Rover: a film with an uncertain mission at its core, like a post-apocalyptic Dude, Where’s My Car?

Lauren Bacall in 1951.
Lauren Bacall, leading lady of Hollywood’s Golden age, has died
By Caroline Crampton - 13 August 13:16

The star of To Have and Have Not and The Big Sleep has had a stroke aged 89. But did she always get the roles she deserved?

Robin Williams as Tom Keating in Dead Poets Society
Remembering Robin Williams (1951-2014)
By New Statesman - 12 August 12:27

The American actor and comedian has been found dead at his home in California, aged 63.

Life after death: Christie and Whishaw in Lilting
Lilting shows how language is not always a barrier to intimacy
By Ryan Gilbey - 08 August 16:15

Ben Whishaw stars as a grieving lover in this tale of cross-generational, Anglo-Chinese friendship. 

The Deer Hunter.
After 36 years, The Deer Hunter remains one of the most fascinating films on Vietnam
By Ryan Gilbey - 05 August 12:42

Though the notorious Russian roulette scene looms large, The Deer Hunter is a tender – and even optimistic – depiction of the human capacity to endure.

Comedy in locomotion: Marilyn Monroe in Some Like it Hot (1959)
Sax and spats: The Culture Studio reviews Some Like it Hot
By Antonia Quirke - 05 August 10:19

There’s such pleasure for the listener in hearing something you know being chewed over properly.

Beast of Eden: Dore Strauch and Friedrich Ritter set up camp in the Galapagos Islands in 1929
Death in paradise: Ryan Gilbey on The Galapagos Affair
By Ryan Gilbey - 28 July 16:13

Drawing largely on home movies shot by the subjects in the 1930s, the picture pieces together the circumstances that led to several unexplained deaths. 

Snowpiercer.
It's some kind of miracle that Snowpiercer was ever released - and it was worth the wait
By Ryan Gilbey - 25 July 12:34

Despite its occasional longeurs and lapses of logic, post-global-freeze thriller Snowpiercer is an intoxicating mishmash of stunts and ideas which deserves to be seen in UK cinemas.

The 50 Shades film trailer shows us Grey's decor is almost as bad as his BDSM rope-work
By Zoe Margolis - 24 July 17:58

Not only does the film look like a bunch of sexist tropes strung out in a row, but if Christian Grey's knots are anything to go by he's rubbish at kink as well.

Award winning director Sofia Coppola at the Cannes Film Festival, May 14, 2014. Photo: Antonin Thuillier, Getty Images
The unspoken glass ceiling of the film industry
By Beth Lambert - 24 July 12:57

A new report uncovers the gender imbalance in the film industry, made worse by the issue of class.

Why publishers should embrace the film world's enthusiasm for releasing a director's cut
By Andrew Ladd - 18 July 12:56

The film world is keen on releasing a director's cut, which differs from the final version of the movie; publishers should do the same with books.

Andy Serkis as the ape-leader Ceasar.
Monkey business: Dawn of the Planet of the Apes is smart, ravishing and bleak
By Ryan Gilbey - 18 July 12:50

The latest addition to the Planet of the Apes franchise is the toughest yet - the transition from playful ape and human interaction to bloody horror comes across as scarily plausible.

Steven Soderberg.
Steven Soderbergh's strange retirement: off-Broadway, brandy and television
By Ryan Gilbey - 16 July 17:58

“Nobody’s talking about movies the way they’re talking about their favourite TV shows,” says veteran director Steven Soderbergh, whose retirement, which isn’t really a retirement, has been stirring up controvesy this week.

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