Fear eats the soul: Hugh (Jake Weary) and Jay (Maika Monroe)
It Follows: a film about a sexually transmitted curse forces us to face mortality itself
By Ryan Gilbey - 26 February 11:23

Ryan Gilbey reviews It Follows, directed by David Robert Mitchell.

Alejandro González Iñárritu’s “Birdman” took the Best Picture award at the 2015 Oscars. Image: Fox Searchlight
Why the Oscars chose Birdman over Boyhood for Best Picture
By Ryan Gilbey - 23 February 12:40

Richard Linklater’s Boyhood is clearly the superior film, but the Academy isn’t considering long-term trends or trying to make a statement. Like an impetuous child, it just grabs the thing that feels good in that particular moment.

The Oscars 2015: the full list of winners
By Anna Leszkiewicz - 23 February 10:43

And the Oscar goes to...

Pablo Larrain with the silver bear for The Club. Photo: Andreas Rentz/Getty
Wayward priests and sexual neuroses: highlights from the Berlin Film Festival
By Ryan Gilbey - 17 February 12:00

There was far more to the festival than Fifty Shades.

The Berlin film festival.
Genau or never: Timelines and plotlines alike confuse at the Berlin Film Festival
By Ryan Gilbey - 16 February 9:42

Terrence Malick’s Knight of Cups is insipid – but Andrew Heigh's 45 Years proves it's not all bad. 

Actors Jamie Dornan (L) and Dakota Johnson attend the "50 Shades Of Grey" New York Fan First screening at Ziegfeld Theatre on 6 February 2015 in New York City. Photo: Getty Images
50 Shades of Grey: a film about male power, idealising emotional abuse as sexy when it isn't
By Zoe Margolis - 13 February 17:41

All good relationships are built on respect, trust and consent - and the one at the centre of this film contains none of that.

Actors Jamie Dornan (L) and Dakota Johnson at a fan screening of Fifty Shades Of Grey. Photo: Mike Coppola/Getty Images
More M&Ms than S&M: Fifty Shades of Grey is noxiously sweet – and totally blank
By Ryan Gilbey - 12 February 13:10

We can’t disparage these actors any more than we can blame a man in a hammerless world for failing to bang a nail into the wall.

Liv Corfixen with her husband Nicolas Winding Refn. Photo: Vittorio Zunino Celotto/Getty Images
“My Life Directed by Nicolas Winding Refn” shows the toll that filmmaking can take on directors
By Ryan Gilbey - 06 February 9:31

The film, made by Winding Refn’s wife Liv Corfixen, is an intriguing contribution to the film-behind-the-films genre and a revealing study of ambition and vulnerability.

Fiercely modern and aggressively cinematic: David Oyelowo as Dr Martin Luther King, Jr in Selma
Supreme leaders: what Selma and The Interview tell us about the power of the leading man
By Ryan Gilbey - 05 February 15:33

The civil rights drama and political farce could not seem more different. But David Oyelowo and James Franco share a dynamism sadly overlooked in awards season.

A still from Pride, the 2014 film about the Lesbians and Gays Support The Miners campaign.
What today’s activists can learn from the Lesbians Against Pit Closures campaign
By Rebecca Winson - 04 February 12:53

Their triumph came through recognising that although their own oppression was important, it didn’t mean they couldn’t recognise others’ struggles as well.

I watched the Oscar hopefuls and every film is full of men, men and more bloody men
By Ian Leslie - 04 February 10:48

Oh, and moaning women. These are the films of the year, the ones that we think best capture the tenor of the times. Yet they are only interested in one half of the human tableau.

Phoenix and Witherspoon star in the cartoon-like film.
From comedy to confusion, Inherent Vice shows the corruption of the hippie dream
By Ryan Gilbey - 29 January 10:22

Thomas Pynchon's novel makes for a wistfully funny film adaptation.

I ain’t afraid of no girls: why the all-female Ghostbusters will be good for Hollywood
By Sarah Ditum - 28 January 16:59

After Parks and Rec30 Rock and Bridesmaids, why do some in the industry still doubt women are funny?

The use of anachronistic music, as in “Marie Antoinette”, is increasingly gaining acceptance.
Why do we care about anachronisms in films?
By Oliver Farry - 28 January 12:05

Our desire for historical accuracy in films, TV programmes and books often tells us more about ourselves than it does about art.

Beyond Clueless: a visual essay on teen movies from 1994-2004.
Beyond Clueless: a giant campus of candy-coloured teen life
By Ryan Gilbey - 23 January 13:10

Half-love letter, half-biopsy, Charlie Lyne's documentary analysis of teen movies is full of flashes of madness.

Have we met before? The mutable Oscar Isaac.
Welcome to Oscar season — Oscar Isaac season, that is
By Ryan Gilbey - 22 January 12:52

Oscar Isaac exploits his unique charisma and mutable appearance in two of the biggest films released this awards season.

Alex Garland with Alicia Vikander on the set of Ex Machina. Photo: Universal
Alex Garland’s Ex Machina: can a film about an attractive robot be feminist science fiction?
By Helen Lewis - 22 January 7:16

In Ex Machina, Alex Garland – writer of The Beach and 28 Days Later  suggests that the brave new dawn of artificial intelligence will not kill off our crappy old gender dynamics. Helen Lewis meets him.

Why women are getting a bum deal on film posters
By Ralph Jones - 20 January 14:31

Film posters are addicted to showing a faceless woman from behind, with her legs framing the real hero.

Miles Teller and J K Simmons in the percussion-based psychological thriller Whiplash.
Whiplash and Foxcatcher show there's more than one way to skin a fox
By Ryan Gilbey - 15 January 13:46

Despite strikingly similar prodigies and deranged mentors, Whiplash and Foxcatcher offer two very different takes on the mentor/pupil relationship.

Actor Chiwetel Ejiofor. Photo by Mike Windle/Getty Images for AACTA
From a black James Bond to a female Sherlock, diverse casting isn’t PC gone mad – it makes stories better
By Helen Lewis - 15 January 10:39

There was a bit more to Agincourt than a dozen Rada graduates standing around between two curtains.

Eddie Redmayne (right) as the young Stephen Hawking in “The Theory of Everything”.
Stephen Hawking would not be Stephen Hawking if he had been born with his disability
By Alex Taylor - 14 January 12:32

The physicist is held up as an example of what you can achieve in life if you have a disability, but he was only diagnosed with motor neurone disease when he was 21 – his career was set in motion while he was still able-bodied.

Marilyn Monroe, photographed on 3 December 1961, when she was 35. Photo: Archive/AFP/Getty Images
From Marilyn Monroe to Audrey Hepburn: why dead women make the ideal brand ambassadors
By Karen Yossman - 12 January 12:35

The trend for using long-dead actresses to front campaigns aimed at female consumers is at best tasteless and at worst insidious.

Take another look: visitors to the National Gallery in Frederick Wiseman’s documentary. Photo: ANDREW EVANS
A view unbroken: the poignancy of Frederick Wiseman's National Gallery documentary
By Ryan Gilbey - 08 January 16:55

The paintings are anything but dry in Frederick Wiseman's documentary about the London gallery.

Meryl Streep, looking less glamorous than usual for Into the Woods.
Stephen Sondheim: A life’s work in progress
By Leo Robson - 08 January 16:06

On Stephen Sondheim’s 85th birthday, he will be revered as the genius of musical theatre. But his failures are just as fascinating as his successes.

Ethan Hawke.
Ethan Hawke on working with River Phoenix: “I never felt more ordinary in my life”
By Ryan Gilbey - 05 January 18:33

The smart, insightful and oddly underrated US actor Ethan Hawke on first meeting River Phoenix, the Sony hacking crisis and “the beauty of censorship”.

David Robert Mitchell’s chiller It Follows offers more than just frights (although it does those too).
From monster franchises to arthouse gems: films to look forward to in 2015
By Ryan Gilbey - 01 January 11:10

The new year already offers the promise of Tilda Swinton in a fetching wig and the scariest film since Halloween. What's not to like?

We love ya, tomorrow: Quvenzhané Wallis stars in the new remake of Annie, directed by Will Gluck
Thrills, flops and hard knocks: films to watch this Christmas
By Ryan Gilbey - 22 December 15:54

Ryan Gilbey casts an eye over the Christmas fare.

The Bardarbunga volcano in south-east Iceland in September 2014. Photo: Bernard Meric/AFP/Getty Images
From Werner Herzog to Pompeii: the difficulties of capturing volcanoes in film
By Oliver Farry - 22 December 10:59

It is strange that the full terror of the volcano has rarely been harnessed for narrative purposes – most films about eruptions end up as camp disaster flicks.

Premiere.
Gossip about the hacked Sony emails isn’t news, or newsworthy, or remotely justifiable
By Ryan Gilbey - 18 December 11:01

These are not politicians, or powerful corporations meddling with our data, they are Hollywood executives bickering like anyone else. The free speech argument just doesn’t add up.

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