A still from “Margarita, with a Straw”.
Margarita, with a Straw: an Indian indie film with a lot to say about disability and sexuality
By Eleanor Margolis - 22 October 12:04

Central character Laila is hounded by reminders that she’s different, but refreshingly, never accepts this herself.

Luke Evans in Dracula Untold.
What the historical inaccuracies in “Dracula Untold” tell us about the rise of Islamophobia
By Elest Ali - 20 October 17:13

The vilification of Islam has reached such heights that when the Muslim Sultan Mehmet II is cast opposite history’s bloodiest psycho-tyrant, it’s Dracula who emerges as the tragic hero.

John Travolta and Samuel L Jackson radiate effortless cool in Pulp Fiction.
Twenty years on, it’s time to admit that Pulp Fiction is a bad film
By Sam Moore - 20 October 12:47

It’s time we recognised that Quentin Tarantino’s much-lauded movie is about nothing, says nothing and makes you feel nothing.

Tanks for the memories: Brad Pitt and crew in Fury, a misfiring mix of horror and schmaltz
Belly of the beast: Brad Pitt’s new war movie veers from horror to schmaltz
By Ryan Gilbey - 17 October 15:18

For every stab at dirty realism in Fury, there is a sanitising touch to make everything clean again.

Thugs with thick skins: in Goodfellas (1990) De Niro boils over with conflicting emotions. Photo: Moviestorecollection.com
Mythical, merciless butchness: Martin Scorsese’s men
By Tom Shone - 16 October 15:48

From De Niro’s snarl to DiCaprio’s sinewy wildness, no director has explored masculinity as acutely as Scorsese, writes Tom Shone

The original cast of Ghostbusters.
Dad’s Army and Ghostbusters: how to reboot a beloved comedy without ruining it
By Ryan Gilbey - 16 October 12:31

The news that both a Dad’s Army film and Ghostbusters 3 are in the works is great for nostalgia fans. But how do you go about updating something well-loved without wrecking it?

Pucker up: Shahid Kapoor as Haider/Hamler and Shraddha Kapoor as Arshia/Ophelia
To pout or not to pout: Hamlet goes Bollywood
By Ryan Gilbey - 14 October 10:56

Bhardwaj relocates the action to Kashmir in the mid-1990s. If the graft doesn’t quite take, it’s because the film is so persuasive in portraying the oppression of the Kashmiri people that the woes of Hamlet seem small beer.

Emma Thompson attends a photocall for BAFTA's Screenwriter Lecture series at BFI Southbank, 20 September. Photo: Getty
Emma Thompson’s leap into the dark
By Caroline Crampton - 09 October 10:00

Thompson is best known for playing complicated intellectual women, often in period dramas. But at the outset, sketch comedy was where she saw herself.

Pride.
Did Pride really deserve an adult rating in the US? Yes, it did
By Ryan Gilbey - 08 October 13:15

The Motion Picture Association of America may have a poor track record on equality - but in the case of Pride their decision was just and correct.

Rosamund Pike and Ben Affleck as Amy and Nick in Gone Girl.
Female villains and false accusations: a feminist defence of Gone Girl
By Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett - 07 October 13:20

Gone Girl is not anti-feminist. True equality is admitting that women can be evil too.

Pierre Niney and Charlotte Le Bon in “Yves Saint Laurent” (2014). Photo: Thibault Grabherr
What lies behind French film’s fascination with the glory days of Les Trente Glorieuses?
By Oliver Farry - 06 October 13:31

A recent spate of biopics focused on the cultural icons of France’s prosperous decades after World War Two prompt the question: what is it about those years that keeps French cinema harking back to them?

Other side of perfect: Nick Dunne (Ben Affleck) and Amy (Rosamund Pike).
David Fincher’s Gone Girl is a grim comedy about the impossibility of perfection
By Ryan Gilbey - 02 October 15:00

This film, adapted by Gillian Flynn from her bestselling thriller, is a whodunnit without a body.

Fading icon: Havana Segrand (Julianne Moore) stars in Cronenberg’s satire.
David Cronenberg’s Maps to the Stars sees Hollywood as a disease
By Ryan Gilbey - 25 September 17:11

Maps to the Stars places elements of ghost story, black comedy and Hollywood satire in a screwball framework.

George Sluizer.
George Sluizer (1932-2014): The obsessive director behind River Phoenix’s last film
By Ryan Gilbey - 23 September 12:10

The Dutch director, who has died aged 82, stole the unfinished reels for Phoenix’s last film Dark Blood from after coming close to death in 2007.

A chase in Allan Dwan’s “Trail of the Vigilantes” (1940). Photo: Hulton Archive/Getty Images
The European Western: popular culture for the late Imperial age
By Oliver Farry - 22 September 14:45

It wasn’t just Hollywood that revelled in the glorious adventures offered by the Western as a genre – Europe made its fair share, too.

Emma Stone and Colin Firth.
Magic in the Moonlight: Another year, another Woody Allen mediocrity
By Ryan Gilbey - 18 September 17:50

It is astonishing, with actors as gifted as Colin Firth and Emma Stone, that Woody Allen’s latest film so badly misses the mark.

“The Riot Club” is based on Laura Wade’s Bullingdon Club-inspired Royal Court play “Posh”.
If only the lads of The Riot Club were a little less revolting
By Ryan Gilbey - 18 September 13:07

Lone Scherfig’s film adaptation of the 2010 play Posh feels unbalanced: we want to see a bit of naughty fun before the nastiness kicks in.

“The Riot Club” is based on Laura Wade’s Bullingdon Club-based Royal Court play “Posh”.
The Riot Club’s portrayal of a restaurant-smashing Oxbridge elite lacks political bite
By Conrad Landin - 12 September 15:52

The film, adapted from Laura Wade’s Bullingdon Club-based play Posh, fails to address the fact that it isn’t just the restaurant-smashers who benefit from Oxbridge elitism.

Strike partners: marching for the miners in Pride
Glitter and grit: when gay rights activists allied with the miners
By Ryan Gilbey - 12 September 10:18

Pride takes a subject that might be considered earnest or marginal and smuggles it through in jazzy, feel-good colours.

The great contender: Brando at his parents' home in Illinois in 1951. Photo: Art Shay/The Life Images Collection/Getty
Marlon fishing: was Brando really brain as well as brawn?
By Christopher Bray - 11 September 10:00

Susan Mizruchi considers Brando a kind of one-man UN. Alas, she also unwittingly demonstrates how elitist and dictatorial her putative freedom fighter could be.

A reprisal of The Last House on the Left shows 35mm film is not dead yet
By Alexander Woolley - 08 September 15:00

Hollywood is scaling back on analogue film, but in the UK dedicated fans are organising screenings in 35mm to try and keep the medium alive.

Reel deal: the old-style American drive-in has become a relic and may soon disappear
That’s all, folks: what the end of 35mm film means for cinema
By Helen Alexander and Rhys Blakely - 08 September 10:00

Like all things human, the 35mm reel is slowly shuffling off this mortal coil. This year, Paramount Pictures became the first big studio to announce that it would no longer release 35mm prints of movies in the US.

In The Basement.
2014 London Film Festival preview: French house music, Austrian basements and the British Harmony Korine
By Ryan Gilbey - 05 September 12:17

Our film critic Ryan Gilbey previews the 58th London Film Festival, which opens next month.

Not fade away: Philip Seymour Hoffman
Mark Lawson: The posthumous films of Philip Seymour Hoffman and Robin Williams
By Mark Lawson - 04 September 17:21

The problem is that film is a form of immortality but it is disturbing if we see the ghost too soon or with scars that remind us of their departure. 

Stranger at the door: Dan Stevens as David
Downton to downright nasty: Dan Stevens’s dramatic transformation
By Ryan Gilbey - 04 September 16:46

In The Guest, Stevens plays David, a stranger who pitches up on the doorstep of a grieving American family. He claims to be a friend of their eldest son, who died in combat in Afghanistan but it’s clear to the viewer he’s bad news. 

Eva Green.
Beaten to a pulp: Why the hyper-stylised Sin City is in need of Raymond Chandler
By Ryan Gilbey - 29 August 10:00

Sin City: A Dame to Kill For imagines what 1940s cinema might have looked like with CGI and no Hays Code - but it falls short of that era’s crackling dialogue, smoky characters and emotional pull.

Dogfight proves that a famous name is not the only reason to adapt a film for the stage
By Ryan Gilbey - 28 August 15:15

Dogfight at the Southwark Playhouse shows that a musical using an existing film as its springboard is no more or less likely to succeed than an entirely original work. And rightly so.

Night Moves.
Night Moves: an environmental thriller with an intractable problem at its core
By Ryan Gilbey - 26 August 10:30

Jesse Eisenberg and Dakota Fanning star as eco-warriors in Kelly Reichardt’s tense new film, two radicals who plan to blow up a hydroelectric dam.

It's only a movie: horror films may claim cultural relevance but their main appeal is shock or terror
Blood money: how the market affects what horror makes it to Hollywood
By Yo Zushi - 22 August 12:13

Recent torture pornographers such as Eli Roth arguably have aligned themselves with 1970s American horror auteurs not only to legitimise their work but to cash in on their rebel credibility.

Pages