Peter Kennard: G8 protest posters

As world leaders prepare to meet for the global summit, activist artist Peter Kennard creates readily sharable ‘posters for protest’.

On the 17 and 18 of June, leaders of the world’s eight wealthiest countries will convene at Lough Erne - a lakeside golf resort in Northern Ireland - to address the world’s pressing concerns. It is the UK’s turn as acting president of the annual G8 summit, where David Cameron will be tabling his three global issues “critical for growth, prosperity and economic devolvement”: advancing trade, ensuring tax compliance and promoting greater transparency.

An air of scepticism inhabits the summit’s wake. In our cover story this week, Ian Bremmer argues such bargaining forums, including the G20, have “not produced much of value”; resultant of an “expanding global leadership vacuum”.  

Equally suspicious photomontage artist and activist Peter Kennard has a produced a series of G8 posters “designed for protest”. Posted to a special Tumblr page, the artist is encouraging all to trade the images widely: “print, Tweet, Facebook, email and share these images as a sign of protest”. There is even talk of a ‘guerilla street gallery’ to take place in Manchester, Belfast and near Enniskillen – the golf resort’s neighbouring parish.

The prints, first published in Kennard’s book @earth, convey mistrust and biting political critique: a ‘football globe’ booted off the laces of a military trooper; the glamorous elite gambling nuclear warheads at a shadowy card table.

“If world leaders insist on assaulting our lives and livelihoods,” rallies Kennard on the Tumblr page, “let’s hit back by assaulting their eyes. You’re welcome.”

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[All images Peter Kennard. Download here: g8protestposters.tumblr.com/download]

From Peter Kennard's G8 protester posters (via Tumblr)

Charlotte Simmonds is a writer and blogger living in London. She was formerly an editorial assistant at the New Statesman. You can follow her on Twitter @thesmallgalleon.

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7 things we learned from the Comic Relief Love, Actually sequel

Even gay subtext is enough to get you killed.

After weeks of hype, the Love, Actually Comic Relief short sequel, Red Nose Day, Actually, finally aired tonight. It might not compare to Stephen’s version of events, but was exactly what you’d expect, really – the most memorable elements of each plotline recreated and recycled, with lots of jokes about the charity added in. So what did Red Nose Day, Actually actually teach us?

Andrew Lincoln’s character was always a creep

It was weird to show up outside Keira Knightley’s house in 2003, and it’s even weirder now, when you haven’t seen each other in almost a decade. Please stop.

It’s also really weird to bring your supermodel wife purely to show her off like a trophy. She doesn’t even know these people. She must be really confused. Let her go home, “Mark”.

Kate Moss is forever a great sport

Judging by the staggering number of appearances she makes at these things, Kate Moss has never said no to a charity appearance, even when she’s asked to do the most ridiculous and frankly insulting things, like pretend she would ever voluntarily have sex with “Mark”.

Self-service machines are a gift and a curse

In reality, Rowan Atkinson’s gift-wrapping enthusiast would have lasted about one hour in Sainsbury’s before being replaced by a machine.

Colin Firth’s character is an utter embarrassment, pull yourself together man

You’re a writer, Colin. You make a living out of paying attention to language and words. You’ve been married to your Portuguese-speaking wife for almost fourteen years. You learned enough to make a terrible proposal all those years ago. Are you seriously telling me you haven’t learned enough to sustain a single conversation with your family? Do you hate them? Kind of seems that way, Colin.

Even gay subtext is enough to get you killed

As Eleanor Margolis reminds us, a deleted storyline from the original Love, Actually was one in which “the resplendent Frances de la Tour plays the terminally ill partner of a “stern headmistress” with a marshmallow interior (Anne Reid).” Of course, even in deleted scenes, gay love stories can only end in death, especially in 2003. The same applies to 2017’s Red Nose Day actually. Many fans speculated that Bill Nighy’s character was in romantic love with his manager, Joe – so, reliably, Joe has met a tragic end by the time the sequel rolls around.  

Hugh Grant is a fantasy Prime Minister for 2017

Telling a predatory POTUS to fuck off despite the pressure to preserve good relations with the USA? Inspirational. No wonder he’s held on to office this long, despite only demonstrating skills of “swearing”, “possibly harassing junior staff members” and “somewhat rousing narration”.

If you get together in Christmas 2003, you will stay together forever. It’s just science.

Even if you’ve spent nearly fourteen years clinging onto public office. Even if you were a literal child when you met. Even if you hate your wife so much you refuse to learn her first language.

Now listen to the SRSLY Love, Actually special:

Anna Leszkiewicz is a pop culture writer at the New Statesman.