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Anas Sarwar resigns as Scottish Labour deputy leader

The shadow cabinet is likely his next stop.

By George Eaton

Anas Sarwar’s decision to stand down as Scottish Labour’s deputy leader, which he announced at the party’s gala dinner tonight, does not come as a surprise. There is a common recognition across the party that it needs fresh figures at the top and that they must be MSPs (Sarwar represents the Westminster seat of Glasgow Central).

The next Scottish Labour leader (almost certainly Jim Murphy) will now be free to take office with a new deputy. The contest for the latter will run alongside that for the former, with the winners announced on 13 December. Shadow education secretary Kezia Dugdale, who some urged to run for the leadership, Jenny Marra and James Kelly (who co-chair Murphy’s leadership campaign) are regarded as the frontrunners for the post. 

Sarwar told the Daily Record“After thinking about it long and hard over the last few days I have decided that I believe Scottish Labour should be represented by a leadership team that is focused on the Scottish Parliament. It has been a privilege to serve as deputy leader for the last three years and a honour I never thought I would receive.

“But I think the leadership contest that is going on now is a time for everybody to reflect on what is best for Scottish Labour. And after much soul searching I have come to the conclusion that I believe the Scottish Labour leadership team should be focused on Holyrood.

“I have spoken to Ed Miliband and informed him of this decision and told him I want to devote my efforts to securing a Labour victory at next year’s general election and help make Ed Miliband Prime Minister.”

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But Sarwar is unlikely to fade into the shadows. Having relinquished his position, there is a strong chance that he will enter the shadow cabinet as part of the reshuffle that will be triggered by Murphy’s decision to stand for leader. One move suggested by several Labour sources is for shadow Scottish secretary Margaret Curran to replace Murphy as shadow international development secretary, with Sarwar taking on her brief. 

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