School dominated by black and Asian pupils will lead to a "sexual volcano", warns Tory councillor

Allowing the Durand Academy in Brixton to open a branch in West Sussex will lead to a "sexual volcano" with too many pupils from "nationalities where they are uncertain what hard work is about", says councillor.

The Durand Academy in Brixton is a high-performing London school whose leadership has been repeatedly praised by education secretary Michael Gove.

Next year, it plans to open a second site in Stedham, West Sussex where pupils will be housed Monday to Friday in a disused school building. 

The Mail on Sunday today reports that several Stedham residents have objected to the scheme. While some of those quoted undoubtedly have genuine objections, there are also some whose statements range from the eyebrow-raising to the outright shocking.

For example, John Cherry, county councillor for Midhurst, told the MoS:

"Ninety-seven per cent of pupils will be black or Asian. It depends what type of Asian. If they’re Chinese they’ll rise to the top. If they’re Indian they’ll rise to the top. If they’re Pakistani they won’t.

"There are certain nationalities where hard work is highly valued. There are certain nationalities where they are uncertain what this hard work is all about.

"If the children are not allowed out of the site then it will make them want to escape into the forest – it will be a sexual volcano.

"Stockwell is a coloured area – I have no problem with that. To be honest, I would far rather Durand took over a secondary school in London rather than shoving everybody here."

Cherry won his county council seat in November 2012 with 78 per cent of the vote. The only other candidate was Ukip's Douglas Denny, who gained 21.8 per cent. 

Cherry has been contacted for comment.

Update, 3pm: Labour's education spokesman Stephen Twigg made this statement earlier today: "When a Tory councillor makes openly racist comments like these, it's no surprise people still think of the Conservatives as the nasty party. David Cameron must condemn his councillor's words and take immediate action against Councillor Cherry to show that he will not accept racism in his party."

James Chapman, the Daily Mail's political editor, has just tweeted the following, making it likely that John Cherry will not be a Conservative councillor for much longer.

Update 22 April 2013 8.20am:

John Cherry has now resigned as a councillor. In a statement, he said:

My remarks about Durand Academy, as reported in the Mail on Sunday, were plainly wrong. They were thoughtless and extremely foolish. I unreservedly apologise and withdraw them. I very much regret the distress this must have caused.

According to the BBC, a Conservative Party spokesman said Cherry's comments were "totally unacceptable" and did "not reflect the views of the Conservative Party".

Michael Gove has praised the Durand Academy. Photo: Getty

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.

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Sadiq Khan gives Jeremy Corbyn's supporters a lesson on power

The London mayor doused the Labour conference with cold electoral truths. 

There was just one message that Sadiq Khan wanted Labour to take from his conference speech: we need to be “in power”. The party’s most senior elected politician hammered this theme as relentlessly as his “son of a bus driver” line. His obsessive emphasis on “power” (used 38 times) showed how far he fears his party is from office and how misguided he believes Jeremy Corbyn’s supporters are.

Khan arrived on stage to a presidential-style video lauding his mayoral victory (a privilege normally reserved for the leader). But rather than delivering a self-congratulatory speech, he doused the conference with cold electoral truths. With the biggest personal mandate of any British politician in history, he was uniquely placed to do so.

“Labour is not in power in the place that we can have the biggest impact on our country: in parliament,” he lamented. It was a stern rebuke to those who regard the street, rather than the ballot box, as the principal vehicle of change.

Corbyn was mentioned just once, as Khan, who endorsed Owen Smith, acknowledged that “the leadership of our party has now been decided” (“I congratulate Jeremy on his clear victory”). But he was a ghostly presence for the rest of the speech, with Khan declaring “Labour out of power will never ever be good enough”. Though Corbyn joined the standing ovation at the end, he sat motionless during several of the applause lines.

If Khan’s “power” message was the stick, his policy programme was the carrot. Only in office, he said, could Labour tackle the housing crisis, air pollution, gender inequality and hate crime. He spoke hopefully of "winning the mayoral elections next year in Liverpool, Manchester and Birmingham", providing further models of campaigning success. 

Khan peroration was his most daring passage: “It’s time to put Labour back in power. It's time for a Labour government. A Labour Prime Minister in Downing Street. A Labour Cabinet. Labour values put into action.” The mayor has already stated that he does not believe Corbyn can fulfil this duty. The question left hanging was whether it would fall to Khan himself to answer the call. If, as he fears, Labour drifts ever further from power, his lustre will only grow.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.