Former shadow policing minister David Ruffley was cautioned for domestic assault on his former partner in March this year. Photo: Getty
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Tories investigate MP over domestic assault caution

Michael Gove has launched a probe into Bury St Edmunds MP David Ruffley, after he was issued with a domestic assault caution earlier this year.

David Ruffley MP is under investigation by the Conservative party after receiving a caution for domestic assault earlier this year.

Michael Gove, the Government chief whip, launched an inquiry into the MP for Bury St Edmunds after his constituency Police and Crime Commissioner and a prominent member of the local clergy complained.

Ruffley accepted a police caution for common assault after an incident involving his former partner four  months ago.

His local Conservative Association brought forward a meeting to review the scandal from September to next week and could decide to initiate formal de-selection proceedings at a later date.

Growing public outrage has forced Gove's hand to intervene in a bid to stem damage to the party. He is expected to approach Ruffley personally to ascertain details of the incident.

The Dean of St Edmundsbury Cathedral wrote personally to Ruffley, copying her letter to Gove, Lord Tebbit and senior local Tories.

The Very Reverend Dr Frances Ward wrote: “You tried to convince me that in the ‘incident’ back in March there was blame on both sides. When I visited [redacted] in March a day or so after the event and went to hug her as my usual greeting, she winced in obvious pain.

"She told me as a friend and her priest of the events of the evening that had led to your arrest, and how frightened she had been of your rage and violent behaviour.”

Ward added: “It is my belief that you have lost the confidence of a significant proportion of your former supporters and should consider your position.”

Tim Passmore, the Conservative Police and Crime Commissioner for Suffolk, described Ruffley’s caution as “an implicit admission of guilt”.

“Domestic abuse is a dreadful crime which should not, and must not ever be tolerated, regardless of the circumstances,” he said. “This applies to all people regardless of wealth or status in society.”

He added: “The future of David Ruffley as a Member of Parliament and prospective Conservative parliamentary candidate for the Bury St Edmunds constituency is a matter for their association but I hope I have made my views entirely clear, such behaviour is inexcusable.”

Bury Fawcett Society, a women’s rights group, have also called for the MP to be dropped at the next election.

Yesterday Ruffley issued a statement through his lawyer, in which he said he “deeply regrets” the behaviour that led to the police caution for common assault.

He admitted that the assault was “inappropriate action”, but said does not “condone” domestic violence. He has apologised and his ex-partner has accepted his apology, he said.

Lucy Fisher writes about politics and is the winner of the Anthony Howard Award 2013. She tweets @LOS_Fisher.

 

How Jim Murphy's mistake cost Labour - and helped make Ruth Davidson

Scottish Labour's former leader's great mistake was to run away from Labour's Scottish referendum, not on it.

The strange revival of Conservative Scotland? Another poll from north of the border, this time from the Times and YouGov, shows the Tories experiencing a revival in Scotland, up to 28 per cent of the vote, enough to net seven extra seats from the SNP.

Adding to the Nationalists’ misery, according to the same poll, they would lose East Dunbartonshire to the Liberal Democrats, reducing their strength in the Commons to a still-formidable 47 seats.

It could be worse than the polls suggest, however. In the elections to the Scottish Parliament last year, parties which backed a No vote in the referendum did better in the first-past-the-post seats than the polls would have suggested – thanks to tactical voting by No voters, who backed whichever party had the best chance of beating the SNP.

The strategic insight of Ruth Davidson, the Conservative leader in Scotland, was to to recast her party as the loudest defender of the Union between Scotland and the rest of the United Kingdom. She has absorbed large chunks of that vote from the Liberal Democrats and Labour, but, paradoxically, at the Holyrood elections at least, the “Unionist coalition” she assembled helped those parties even though it cost the vote share.

The big thing to watch is not just where the parties of the Union make gains, but where they successfully form strong second-places against whoever the strongest pro-Union party is.

Davidson’s popularity and eye for a good photo opportunity – which came first is an interesting question – mean that the natural benefactor in most places will likely be the Tories.

But it could have been very different. The first politician to hit successfully upon the “last defender of the Union” routine was Ian Murray, the last Labour MP in Scotland, who squeezed both the  Liberal Democrat and Conservative vote in his seat of Edinburgh South.

His then-leader in Scotland, Jim Murphy, had a different idea. He fought the election in 2015 to the SNP’s left, with the slogan of “Whether you’re Yes, or No, the Tories have got to go”.  There were a couple of problems with that approach, as one  former staffer put it: “Firstly, the SNP weren’t going to put the Tories in, and everyone knew it. Secondly, no-one but us wanted to move on [from the referendum]”.

Then again under different leadership, this time under Kezia Dugdale, Scottish Labour once again fought a campaign explicitly to the left of the SNP, promising to increase taxation to blunt cuts devolved from Westminster, and an agnostic position on the referendum. Dugdale said she’d be open to voting to leave the United Kingdom if Britain left the European Union. Senior Scottish Labour figures flirted with the idea that the party might be neutral in a forthcoming election. Once again, the party tried to move on – but no-one else wanted to move on.

How different things might be if instead of running away from their referendum campaign, Jim Murphy had run towards it in 2015. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.

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