Watch: how Tory minister Anna Soubry stood up to Farage's immigration scaremongering

Rather than pandering to the UKIP leader, Soubry declared on Question Time: "You do not talk facts, you talk prejudice."

Appearing on Question Time with Nigel Farage last night, Tory minister Anna Soubry unexpectedly (and brilliantly) departed from the Lynton Crosby script and launched a full-frontal attack on the UKIP leader for his scaremongering over immigration. Rather than pandering to Farage, as most Conservatives would do, she said: "You talk about facts – in my constituency your party put out a leaflet saying 29 million people from Romania and Bulgaria were going to flood into our country. Well, the population is only 27-and-a-half million of the two of them.

"You do not talk facts, you talk prejudice. That’s what you talk, and you scaremonger and you put fear in people’s hearts.

"Look, times are tough. We know that. But when times are tough, there’s a danger and history tells us when things are not good, you turn to the stranger and you blame them. And you shouldn’t. That is wrong. And I’m proud of our country’s history and I’m proud that people come here."

Courtesy of Political Scrapbook, you can watch footage of the clash from 30 seconds onwards.

But if Soubry's words were inspiring, she must know that they apply as much to her own party's ministers as to Farage. Theresa May and Iain Duncan Smith relentlessly whip up fear over "benefit tourism" despite there being no evidence for their claims. David Cameron portrays migrants as a "constant drain" on the UK, casually disregarding their net contribution to the economy. But in these populist times, Soubry's tour de force was a comforting reminder that there are still some Conservatives (Ken Clarke and Gavin Barwell among them) who trade in facts, not prejudice.

UKIP leader Nigel Farage speaks at a fringe event at the Conservative Party conference in Manchester Town Hall on September 30, 2013. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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New Digital Editor: Serena Kutchinsky

The New Statesman appoints Serena Kutchinsky as Digital Editor.

Serena Kutchinsky is to join the New Statesman as digital editor in September. She will lead the expansion of the New Statesman across a variety of digital platforms.

Serena has over a decade of experience working in digital media and is currently the digital editor of Newsweek Europe. Since she joined the title, traffic to the website has increased by almost 250 per cent. Previously, Serena was the digital editor of Prospect magazine and also the assistant digital editor of the Sunday Times - part of the team which launched the Sunday Times website and tablet editions.

Jason Cowley, New Statesman editor, said: “Serena joins us at a great time for the New Statesman, and, building on the excellent work of recent years, she has just the skills and experience we need to help lead the next stage of our expansion as a print-digital hybrid.”

Serena Kutchinsky said: “I am delighted to be joining the New Statesman team and to have the opportunity to drive forward its digital strategy. The website is already established as the home of free-thinking journalism online in the UK and I look forward to leading our expansion and growing the global readership of this historic title.

In June, the New Statesman website recorded record traffic figures when more than four million unique users read more than 27 million pages. The circulation of the weekly magazine is growing steadily and now stands at 33,400, the highest it has been since the early 1980s.