Cameron recalls parliament and promises vote on Syria

PM says there will be a vote on Thursday on a government motion on UK action in Syria.

After days of pressure from MPs from all parties, David Cameron has just announced on Twitter that parliament will be recalled on Thursday and that MPs will be given a vote on the UK's response to last week's chemical weapons attack. 

Having granted a vote (as was inevitable given the Libya precedent), Cameron now faces the challenge of winning over sceptical Tory MPs and the opposition. As I noted earlier today, Douglas Alexander warned that Labour would be prepared to whip its MPs against military action if it was unpersuaded by the case for intervention. He added that he was "unconvinced" that an air campaign could "decisively resolve" the conflict. 

Of the parties, UKIP and Plaid Cymru have so far declared their opposition to any intervention. 

A Syria opposition fighter holding a rocket propelled grenade as others take cover from an attack by regime forces on August 26, 2013. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.