Senate passes fiscal cliff deal

Bill would prevent middle class taxes from rising.

Two hours after the midnight deadline, the US Senate voted 89-8 to pass legislation that would block the worst effects of the so-called "fiscal cliff". The bill would prevent middle-class taxes from rising, and raise rates on incomes over $400,000 for individuals and $450,000 for couples. The vote was the result of a bipartisan deal reached on Monday night to block some (but not all) of the austerity measures due to kick in today.

The implementation of the deal now depends on a vote in the Republican-controlled House of Representatives, due to take place today or tomorrow. Barack Obama has called for it to follow the Senate example "without delay" and vote in favour of the deal.

But since the midnight deadline was missed, the question remains - did the US go over the cliff after all, and does it make a difference?

The Guardian thinks so:

Technically the US has just gone over the cliff but if the House approves the agreement the economic damage could be fleeting and relatively minor. The goal will be to have full Congressional approval before Wall Street reopens on Wednesday.

Barack Obama. Photograph: Getty Images

Caroline Crampton is web editor of the New Statesman.

Photo: Getty Images/Carl Court
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Nigel Farage: welcoming refugees will lead to "migrant tide" of jihadists

Ukip's leader Nigel Farage claims that housing refugees will allow Isis to smuggle in "jihadists".

Nigel Farage has warned that granting sanctuary to refugees could result in Britain being influenced by Isis. 

In remarks that were immediately condemned online, the Ukip leader said "When ISIS say they will flood the migrant tide with 500,000 of their own jihadists, we'd better listen", before saying that Angela Merkel, the German Chancellor, had done something "very dangerous" in attempting to host refugees, saying that she was "compounding the pull factors" that lead migrants to attempt the treacherous Mediterranean crossing.

Farage, who has four children, said that as a father, he was "horrified" by the photographs of small children drowned on a European beach, but said housing more refugees would simply make the problem worse. 

The Ukip leader, who failed for the fifth successive occassion to be elected as an MP in May, said he welcomed the prospect of a Jeremy Corbyn victory, describing it as a "good result". Corbyn is more sceptical about the European Union than his rivals for the Labour leadership, which Farage believes will provide the nascent Out campaign with a boost. 

 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.