Medieval philosopher-savant Roger Bacon. Engraving by R Cooper, print by Agidius Sadelam. Hulton Archive/Getty Images
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John the Pupil by David Flusfeder: a novel of quiet suggestion and unobtrusive cleverness

David Flusfeder’s novel John the Pupil follows three students of the medieval philosopher-savant Roger Bacon who make a secretive journey from England to the seat of the papacy at Viterbo.

John the Pupil 
David Flusfeder
Fourth Estate, 240pp, £14.99

“All historical novels are failures, or, at best, metaphors, dressing up the present day in anachronistic disguise.” So complains the fictional academic invented by David Flusfeder to frame and gloss the medieval pilgrimage at the heart of his seventh novel. Flusfeder is not the first historical story­teller to fret like this over his ethics and methods. Treating the remote past with narrative techniques that did not emerge until the 19th century is a problematic business and writers working in the genre bump up constantly against difficulties of lan­guage and form.

How they address them depends on what they are trying to do. In the Man Booker Prize-longlisted novel The Wake, set during the Norman conquest, Paul Kingsnorth bolts together bits of Old, Middle and modern English in order to describe “a folc harried beatan a world brocen apart”, suggesting a time and a world-view so distant that readers need a new language to understand them. Adam Thorpe’s superb 1992 debut, Ulverton, told its story through meticulously faked documents from the history of an English village; his Hodd (2009) similarly filtered its Robin Hood tale through a dodgy translation of a medieval-Latin original. Such novels attempt to challenge the bland imaginative transpositions of historical romance, suggesting in their forms the difficulty of getting a clear signal from the past.

Other writers employ the opposite method. Hilary Mantel’s lithe modern prose in her Tudor novels reanimates our understanding of a period that is so often smothered in ye-olde cliché, while the breezy modernity of Robert Harris’s style allows the reader to see his Cicero books through the prism of the war on terror or to approach An Officer and a Spy (2013), his thriller about the Dreyfus affair, with WikiLeaks and whistleblowers in mind.

David Flusfeder mixes a little of both approaches in John the Pupil, a novel that follows three students of the medieval philosopher-savant Roger Bacon who make a secretive journey from England to the seat of the papacy at Viterbo. In their baggage is a copy of Bacon’s Opus Majus, “a magnificence of learning and opinion and ingenious device, which tells of the world and how it is viewed and the arc of the rainbow and the movements of stars and of health and immortality and engines of war”.

Bacon, a Franciscan barred by a mistrustful order from promulgating his theories, is hoping for the pope’s patronage and protection. His apprentice John, the narrator of the tale, is a 19-year-old boy making his first trip out of the monastery, who has “never seen a soldier, or a lion, or a feast on a great man’s table, or a demon or an angel or a nun or a unicorn or a bride or a Jew”. His companions are Bernard, a grumpy drunkard with a talent for drawing, and Andrew, a beautiful youth “who may not resist sensation” and fails serially to do so with a string of willing local girls.

As the three young clerics cross France and Italy, encountering brigands, unscrupulous pilgrims, Albigensian heretics and, oddly, Dante’s pal Guido Cavalcanti on their way, John records the journey on strips of scavenged parchment. Some time between 1267 and the present – so runs the book’s conceit – these fragments have been gathered and arranged by a dubious antiquarian, then reshuffled and translated by a contemporary editor, whose afterword purports to fill in their lacunae but makes troubling modern interpretations of its own.

This sounds like quite a headful but anyone expecting Pale Fire-ish metatextual shenanigans may be bemused by the tart modesty of their execution and by the small space they occupy. Flusfeder’s publishers haven’t done him many favours by puffing the book as a cross between Umberto Eco and Quentin Tarantino, because his droll, elegant prose takes a much stealthier approach than either of those two show-off maestros. He is fascinated by the gaps in knowledge and narrative that interfere with our reception of the past but he is equally intrigued by the strange and god-ridden landscape of medieval thought, suggesting its piety, suffering and awe in a subtly disordered idiom that sets and meets several etymological challenges.

The result is a novel of quiet suggestion and unobtrusive cleverness that ends up leaving a flatteringly large amount to the reader’s imagination. One suspects there’s a cryptic authorial smile lurking behind John’s sad observation, late in the novel, that one of his companions on the road still doesn’t quite trust him. “He suspected me,” he says, “of art.” 

This article first appeared in the 10 September 2014 issue of the New Statesman, Britain in meltdown

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The non-fiction novel that takes readers inside the head of Raoul Moat

Andrew Hankinson’s depiction of Moat’s unravelling is being marketed as biography/true crime, but its semi-fictional world is something more complex.

In July 2010, just weeks after becoming Prime Minister, David Cameron expanded upon his vision for the “Big Society” that he had first unveiled at the 2009 party conference. It promised a “big advance for people power”, in which individuals would be responsible for their actions. “To be British is to be sceptical of authority and the powers that be,” he told conference. “There is a ‘we’ in politics, and not just a ‘me’.”

That same month, just two days after being released from HMP Durham for the assault of a child, the self-employed gardener and former doorman Raoul Moat shot and injured his ex-girlfriend Samantha Stobbart and killed her boyfriend Chris Brown, who he wrongly believed to be a policeman. Moat went on the run, shooting a policeman at point-blank range, then fleeing to the rural Northumberland town of Rothbury. For a week, the story of this exotically named, delusional man who left behind a wealth of material, including letters and four-hour-long Dictaphone recordings, was given joint top billing with Cameron’s “Big Society” – soon to be as dead and buried as Moat, who, cornered by police after a seven-day hunt, killed himself.

The journalist Andrew Hankinson’s depiction of Moat’s unravelling is being marketed as biography/true crime, yet really is a non-fiction novel, in which writer and reader squat inside a mind that moves from irrational anger and self-pity to despondency. Moat’s is a solipsistic narration, in which he is the perennial victim – of circumstance, enemies, authoritarian bureaucracy, police harassment and past lovers. There is little room here for the outside world. Like most outlaws, Moat believed that everyone had failed him. “All my life I wanted death,” he laments.

The real-life Moat story, however, was more than that of a lone fugitive. It was also about rolling news coverage and Facebook groups, some of which celebrated Moat as a Ned Kelly-type folk hero – a “#ledge”. When Cameron denounced him in parliament he inadvertently elevated Moat to a clearer anti-authoritarian position: the antithesis of a “Big Society” citizen, in fact. It is also the story of the Northumbria Police force, which did its very best to show that it had everything under control when it really didn’t.

And, bringing an element of farce to a tragedy, it featured the subplot of a thoroughly leathered Paul Gascoigne – the most exciting and idiosyncratic footballer of his generation – tearing through the countryside in a taxi with a fishing rod, a dressing gown and a rotisserie chicken in an attempt to bring a sense of calm to the situation. “All I want to do is shout, ‘Moaty, it’s  Gazza! Where are you?’” he explained en route during a live radio phone-in. “And I guarantee he will shout his name out: ‘I’m here.’” Gascoigne’s pantomime intervention added to the chaos: now another disenfranchised northern male was running amok. The parallels were evident: Gazza’s career had been beset by injury and alcoholism, Moat’s bodybuilder’s physique was no longer in prime condition after weight loss in prison. Both were separated from their families and prone to self-examination. Onlookers knew it could quite easily have been Gazza holed up in those woods.

Other exponents of the non-fiction novel such as Norman Mailer and Gordon Burn would surely have put all this in, yet Hankinson chooses not to cover any of the peripheral subplots, instead using a second-person narrative to burrow deep into Moat’s paranoia, sourcing all his text from real material. This narrative sacrifice in favour of a singular voice gives the book thrust and authenticity of voice, and manages to show the nuances of a man who was articulate and often capable, and had reached out to social services on many occasions for help. None of which excuses Moat’s action – but it does explain his choices. Where the tabloids favoured the simplicity of the textbook “cold-blooded killer”, Hankinson’s portrait lets the reader make his or her own judgement. Clearly Moat was a bully, and yet he was not born that way. Few are. “There’ll be books written about all this, and you’ll be made out to be some crazed fucking maniac,” he says to himself, with both foresight and grim resignation.

Elsewhere the semi-fictional Moat brushes over past transgressions and labours over the tiniest slights in such repetitive, droning detail that the reader’s sympathy soon wanes. The book’s strength lies in the real-life Moat’s keenness to confess – to be heard, finally, beyond death – through these nocturnal monologues, recorded in his tent after yet another meal of charred burgers. From these remnants, Hankinson deftly assembles the man’s inner workings, lending credibility to his portrait while, beyond the myopic commentary, we know, although we don’t see it, that the outside world is closing in. Critics might ask: why give voice to a loser? Perhaps because in the right hands any real-life story is worth telling, and history should never just record the heroes and victors. The losers play their part, too.

Ben Myers’s novel “Beastings” recently won the Portico Prize for Literature

You Could Do Something Amazing With Your Life [You Are Raoul Moat] by Andrew Hankinson is published by Scribe (211pp, £12.99)

Ben Myers’ novels include Pig Iron and Richard, a Sunday Times book of the year. His writing has appeared in The Guardian, NME, Mojo, Time Out, 3:AM Magazine, Caught By The River and many others. www.benmyersmanofletters.blogspot.com

This article first appeared in the 05 February 2015 issue of the New Statesman, Putin's war