New Editor wanted at Granta and Charles Moore’s lavish book launch

Book news.

John Freeman, the Editor of Granta magazine, will leave to teach creative writing at Columbia University following the publication of their next issue: “Travel”. Sigrid Rausing, the magazine's publisher, is currently on the look out for a replacement.

Over 150,000 people have signed a petition demanding that the UK government take “decisive action [to] make Amazon pay its fair share of UK corporation tax”. The petition drafted by Frances and Keith Smith, independent booksellers from London, was inspired by Margaret Hodge’s questioning of representatives from Google, Amazon and Starbucks last November.

In a throwback to the heyday of publishing, Charles Moore’s authorised biography of Margaret Thatcher was launched at a lavish book party in the Banqueting House in Westminster. David Cameron and George Osborne were in attendance. Jeffery Archer was spotted buying a copy of the book at the temporary stand on the evening, so eager was he, and a number of others, to get hold of a copy.

John le Carré has published his 23rd novel: A Delicate Truth. The team behind Skyfall and Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy have made a short film to celebrate. Watch it here.

Finally, for the discerning voyeur, 25 rare photographs of famous authors.

World Book Day in Bucharest, Romania. Image: Getty Images.

Book talk from the New Statesman culture desk.

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Karen Bradley as Culture Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport.

The most politically charged of the culture minister's responsibilities is overseeing the BBC, and to anyone who works for - or simply loves - the national broadcaster, Karen Bradley has one big point in her favour. She is not John Whittingdale. Her predecessor as culture secretary was notorious for his belief that the BBC was a wasteful, over-mighty organisation which needed to be curbed. And he would have had ample opportunity to do this: the BBC's Charter is due for renewal next year, and the licence fee is only fixed until 2017. 

In her previous job at the Home Office, Karen Bradley gained a reputation as a calm, low-key minister. It now seems likely that the charter renewal will be accomplished with fewer frothing editorials about "BBC bias" and more attention to the challenges facing the organisation as viewing patterns fragment and increasing numbers of viewers move online.

Of the rest of the job, the tourism part just got easier: with the pound so weak, it will be easier to attract visitors to Britain from abroad. And as for press regulation, there is no word strong enough to describe how long the grass is into which it has been kicked.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.