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Singers and dancers perform to Pharrell William's 'Happy' during celebrations at Universal Studios. Photo: Getty
The book that will make you quit your job
By Sophie McBain - 02 September 12:30

Paul Dolan believes all humans strive for happiness, which he defines as a combination of pleasure and a sense of purpose. The problem is that we are often very bad at maximising our own well-being.

Poet Philip Larkin with Monica Jones.
Reviews round-up | 2 September
By New Statesman - 02 September 12:20

The critics’ verdicts on David Mitchell’s The Bone Clocks, Will Self’s Shark, and a new biography of Philip Larkin by James Booth.

Legends: Lauren Bacall with her then husband Humphrey Bogart and their son Stevie in 1951. Photo: Getty
Stardust memories: Lauren Bacall on Woman's Hour
By Antonia Quirke - 01 September 12:22

To mark the death of the actress, Woman’s Hour reran a thrilling 2005 conversation between Bacall and Jenni Murray. 

Felicity Cloake: Recreating Ernest Hemingway’s favourite burger
By Felicity Cloake - 01 September 11:20

The original calls for garlic, spring onion, piccalilli, capers and wine, plus two American spice blends, parsley, grated apple, Cheddar and carrots, shredded ham, soy sauce and tomato.

Lurid: The Rip Van Winkle section of Rock City's fairy-tales tableaux. Photo: K Tempest Bradford/Flickr
A visit to Rock City on Lookout Mountain is a bad trip through a kitsch fairytale grotto
By Will Self - 01 September 10:25

In front of me was the most lurid tableau I’d ever seen: a vast glass case housing myriad individual little scenes from fairy tales, each one illustrated by posed figurines and ditsy bits of model-making.

The politician and his playmaker: Tony Blair and Alex Ferguson in 1996. Photo: Steve Eason/Getty
Pitch perfect: the ten football matches that changed the world
By John Bew - 31 August 11:11

Jim Murphy’s book combines a blokey ethos with a serious tone, and includes the Eton-smashing 1883 FA Cup final, the 1943 Spanish Cup semi-final and Robben Island’s  “Makana League”.

Accidental Narratives
By Jack Underwood - 31 August 10:45

A new poem by Jack Underwood. 

Dazzling in the desert: Dubai skyline. Photo: Getty
Lost in Dubai: Joseph O’Neill’s Booker Prize-longlisted new novel
By Leo Robson - 29 August 16:22

Although the book has no plot to speak of, it keeps extending false hope, writes Leo Robson.

Ringo was the top bandmate with the other Beatles. Photo: Terry O'Neill/Getty Images
Battle of the Beatles: who was the fabbest of the four?
By New Statesman - 29 August 12:13

Four leading figures make their cases for Paul, John, George or Ringo respectively. 

In the Frame: The Last Resort
By Tom Humberstone - 29 August 10:19

Tom Humberstone’s weekly comic.

Bake-off: a table of cakes for the Oxford-Cambridge boat race. Photo: Getty
Tracey Thorn: The kids protest but sugary treats are an ever stickier issue
By Tracey Thorn - 29 August 10:00

The low-fat yoghurts I shovel down my neck and the smoothies I’ve been promoting to my vegetable-allergic teenage son might just as well have been crystal meth.

Eva Green.
Beaten to a pulp: Why the hyper-stylised Sin City is in need of Raymond Chandler
By Ryan Gilbey - 29 August 10:00

Sin City: A Dame to Kill For imagines what 1940s cinema might have looked like with CGI and no Hays Code - but it falls short of that era’s crackling dialogue, smoky characters and emotional pull.

In the New Statesman this week: Autumn Fiction Special
By New Statesman - 28 August 17:08

This week’s New Statesman kicks off a seminal publishing season with reviews of new novels by the biggest names in British literature.

SS officers including former Auschwitz commandant Rudolf Höss (second from left) relax at Solahütte, a resort near the concentration camp, 1944. Photo: courtesy US Holocaust Memorial Museum
Too much information: how scientists and historians captured the brains of Amis and McEwan
By Leo Robson - 28 August 16:22

Novels by both authors seems to be creaking under the burden of researched fact and rehearsed message, but there was a time when their impulses flowed in the opposite direction.

Dentist.
Banal retentive: To Rise Again at a Decent Hour by Joshua Ferris
By Philip Maughan - 28 August 15:30

In his new, Booker-longlisted novel, Joshua Ferris retains his title as the poet of the modern workplace, but his invented religion, Ulmism, proves to be a pretty dry excuse for a quest.

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