Philip Roth calls time on his literary career

The American novelist announces that Nemesis is his final novel.

The American website Salon has picked up on an interview that Philip Roth gave to the French magazine Les Inrocks last month in which the novelist declared that his literary career is at an end. Asked if he still had the desire to write, Roth replied: "To be honest with you, I'm done. Nemesis [the novel Roth published in 2010] will be my last book." Roth told the interviewer that he hadn't written anything for three years and had spent his time instead arranging his archive for his biographer Blake Bailey, who wrote a well-received biography of John Cheever. "I don't want to write my memoirs," he said. "But I wanted my biographer to have material for his book before my death." Roth continued:

At 74, I realised I didn't have a lot of time left, so I decided to re-read the novels I'd loved when I was 20 or 30 ... Dostoevsky, Turgenev, Conrad, Hemingway ... And when I'd finished I decided to re-read all my own books, starting at the end with Nemesis ... I wanted to see if I'd wasted my time writing. And I thought it'd been more or less a success ... I did the best I could have done with what I had.

Nemesis was reviewed in the NS by Leo Robson. "Ever since Goodbye, Columbus," Robson wrote, "Roth has projected, and instilled, a sense of absolute confidence; a half-century on, his gift looks disturbingly like a knack. Nemesis is a forceful, exacting, even word-perfect novel, but it is also unadventurous, familiar, a little otiose - a work beyond the powers of most novelists but well within his."

Roth's previous novel, The Humbling, was treated much more harshly by NS editor Jason Cowley: "The latest product to roll out of the Philip Roth fiction factory is an old man's masturbatory fantasy which, wrapped in a smart dust jacket, the equivalent of the pornographer's brown paper bag, purports to be a novella of late-middle-aged existential crisis - at least during its more serious moments."

More on Philip Roth in the New Statesman:

  • A S Byatt on Roth as "recorder of Darwinian Man".
  • Frank Kermode declares, in a 2010 interview, that Roth is "writing some pretty bad books at the moment".
  • Rick Gekoski, chair of the International Man Booker Prize in 2011, explains why the prize was given to Roth that year.
President Obama presents Philip Roth with the 2010 National Humanities Medal (Photo: Getty Images)

Jonathan Derbyshire is Managing Editor of Prospect. He was formerly Culture Editor of the New Statesman.

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SRSLY #99: GLOW / FANtasies / Search Party

On the pop culture podcast this week: the Netflix wrestling comedy GLOW, a new fanfiction-based web series called FANtasies and the millennial crime drama Search Party.

This is SRSLY, the pop culture podcast from the New Statesman. Here, you can find links to all the things we talk about in the show as well as a bit more detail about who we are and where else you can find us online.

Listen using the player below. . .

. . .or subscribe in iTunes. We’re also on StitcherRSS and SoundCloud – but if you use a podcast app that we’re not appearing in, let us know.

SRSLY is hosted by Caroline Crampton and Anna Leszkiewicz, the NS’s assistant editor and editorial assistant. We’re on Twitter as @c_crampton and @annaleszkie, where between us we post a heady mixture of Serious Journalism, excellent gifs and regularly ask questions J K Rowling needs to answer.

The Links

GLOW

The show on Netflix.

Two interesting reviews: New York Times and Little White Lies.

Screen Rant on the real life wrestling connections.

FANtasies

The show on Fullscreen.

Amanda Hess’s NYT column about it.

Search Party

The show on All4.

For next time:

We are watching Happy Valley.

If you’d like to talk to us about the podcast or make a suggestion for something we should read or cover, you can email srslypod[at]gmail.com.

You can also find us on Twitter @srslypod, or send us your thoughts on tumblr here. If you like the podcast, we’d love you to leave a review on iTunes - this helps other people come across it.

We love reading out your emails. If you have thoughts you want to share on anything we’ve discussed, or questions you want to ask us, please email us on srslypod[at]gmail.com, or @ us on Twitter @srslypod, or get in touch via tumblr here. We also have Facebook now.

Our theme music is “Guatemala - Panama March” (by Heftone Banjo Orchestra), licensed under Creative Commons. 

See you next week!

PS If you missed #98, check it out here.

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