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In the Frame: A Brief Guide to the Non-Apology
By Tom Humberstone - 21 November 11:50

Tom Humberstone's weekly comic.

Jonathan Brugh.
From Orson Welles to What We Do in the Shadows: A brief history of the mockumentary
By Ryan Gilbey - 20 November 17:40

The greatest offerings from the only new film genre to have emerged in the last 50 years.

Hostess cap: Sergeant Dorothy Ellis wearing her WPC uniform outside the Royal Parks Constabulary, 26th June 1978. Photo: Getty
Confessions of a Copper paints a not-so fuzzy picture of the fuzz
By Rachel Cooke - 20 November 16:07

I found it easy to keep my nostalgia in check. Tampering with evidence? Fitting up? Weird comments about “menopausal” shoplifters? No, thanks.

Big chill: Bilginer walks in the bleak landscape of Ceylan's Palme d'Or-winning drama
Cold, cold heart: Winter Sleep is far from a Turkish delight
By Ryan Gilbey - 20 November 16:00

While it is no hardship to gaze upon ravishing images of the landscape as its autumnal glow vanishes under an icy crust, there’s not much to keep the intellect thrumming over the course of 196 minutes.

Rubbernecking: Spitting Image artist Roger Law, subject of a recent Private Passions, pictured in 2000. Photo: Getty
Private Passions favours the gently gently approach
By Antonia Quirke - 20 November 15:49

Antonia Quirke on Radio. 

Image from Venice by Katie and Giancarlo Caldesi (Hardie Grant, £25). Photography: Helen Cathcart
The eastern ghosts that haunt Venetian cuisine
By Felicity Cloake - 20 November 15:48

Once upon a time, the food of Venice was considered the finest in Europe, “specialising in wild boar, peacock, venison, elaborate salads and architectural pastries”.

Mourning in numbers: visitors to the poppies at the Tower of London. Photo: Getty
Will Self: Public mourning is the loyalty oath of the modern British state
By Will Self - 20 November 15:47

The visitors who have filled the precincts of the Tower of London since August have been deeply moved by the great crowd of ceramic poppies planted in its dry moat – but moved by what, exactly?

Central Saint Martins.
Is this the end of the British art school?
By Isabel Sutton - 20 November 15:40

Art schools used to be a place where the socially and intellectually marginal could distinguish themselves. Now, with unattainable entry requirements and a hefty price tag, they’re becoming a dwelling place for commercial interests and the children of the international elite.

The book that flew: A hawk used for pigeon control in St Pancras station. Photo: Getty
Peregrines over Westminster, my bloody great beehive and the Samuel Johnson Prize
By Helen Macdonald - 20 November 10:00

The winner of this year’s Samuel Johnson Prize for her book H is for Hawk chronicles a life-changing week. 

"A metaphor for success and the American Dream": The Apprentice blog series 10, episode 7
By Anoosh Chakelian - 20 November 8:50

Candidates hop on a plane to the city that never... invests.

Signs and wonders: Paul Nash's Landscape of the Megaliths, featured in Adam Thorpe's On Silbury Hill. Image: Lauren McLean/V&A Images
Books of the Year: NS friends and contributors choose their favourite reading of 2014
By New Statesman - 19 November 16:32

Including: Hilary Mantel, Rowan Williams, Grayson Perry, Alan Johnson, A S Byatt, Geoff Dyer, Alex Salmond, Kate Fox, William Boyd and Dave Eggers. 

Jacob Blessing the Sons of Joseph by Rembrandt, Museumslandschaft Hessen Kassel, Germany
Man in the mirror: Rembrandt: the Late Works at the National Gallery
By Michael Prodger - 18 November 17:21

In later life the painter turned away from the light and towards himself.

Shopping for the few: signage in a branch of Waitrose. Photo: George Redgrave/Flickr
The place for rudeness is not in an anonymous letter but the queue in Waitrose
By Nicholas Lezard - 14 November 16:02

Nicholas Lezard’s weekly column, Down and Out. 

A photograph by Garry Winogrand, New York, 1955. Photo: The Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco
Recalling Winograndia: Garry Winogrand's camera captured post-war America like few others
By Oliver Farry - 14 November 13:54

In Paris, the first retrospective of Winogrand's photography for 25 years mines the huge collection of unpublished material in his archives to produce an unprecedented narrative of his career that plays out like a Hollywood biopic.

In the Frame: Monty
By Tom Humberstone - 14 November 10:28

Tom Humberstone's weekly comic.

Dodgy pair: Gillian Anderson and Paul Spector in The Fall
Flirting with the enemy: The Fall’s baffling mission to make murder sexy
By Rachel Cooke - 13 November 16:48

The Fall continues to be shot through with imagery that subtly (and often not so subtly) connects violence against women with sex.

Heavy-handed treatment: Benedict Cumberbatch is Alan Turing in The Imitation Game
Computer says no: How has The Imitation Game managed to make Alan Turing’s story so dull?
By Ryan Gilbey - 13 November 16:39

The way Turing’s story is told is comparable to the montage in Big Brother when Davina McCall told evictees: “Let’s have a look at your best bits.” The Imitation Game is Alan Turing’s best bits.

Life Itself.
Life Itself, the new Roger Ebert documentary, shows just how important a critic can be
By Ryan Gilbey - 13 November 13:22

Nineteen months after his death in April 2013, a new documentary tells the story of Chicago Sun-Times film critic Roger Ebert - his bravery in the face of illness, and his uniquely democratic approach to cinema.

After Copernicus
By Olivia Byard - 13 November 10:00

After such a hellish catastrophe,
what happens to the angels?
Do they tumble down thrones
and dominions like bankers
from tall windows?
           Or, wings torn,

Inspiring: Malala Yousafzai speaks at the Forbes Under 30 Summit in Philadelphia on 21 October. Photo: Getty
Hear their voices: a choral celebration of Malala Yousafzai
By Caroline Crampton - 13 November 10:00

Young British composer James McCarthy and Pakistani writer Bina Shah have collaborated to produce Malala, a dramatic work for choir and orchestra that attempts to capture the spirit of her story.

Better with age: Arjen Robben, who used to play for Chelsea, now at Bayern Munich. Photo: Getty
They may be foreign players, but they’re our foreign players
By Hunter Davies - 13 November 10:00

Hunter Davies’s weekly football column, The Fan.

Strange alliance: Ferrante's Neopolitan novels tell of a decades-long friendship between two women. Photo: Chloe Edwards/Millennium Images UK
In her secret life: who exactly is Elena Ferrante?
By Jane Shilling - 13 November 10:00

As Ferrante’s writing became conspicuous, so did her anonymity. Speculation gathered, not just about her identity but even her sex.

Going solo: in the wild, beady-eyed shoebills are natural solitaries
The silent stillness of a shoebill’s stare
By John Burnside - 13 November 10:00

Staring into this powerful bird’s beady eye – its extraordinary face more African mask than that of a bird – I felt connected for a moment to something old and original.

Looking to Europe: after the Second World War, Churchill became an advocate of the need to build European unity
“One man who made history” by another who seems just to make it up: Boris on Churchill
By Richard J Evans - 13 November 10:00

The book reads as if it was dictated, not written. All the way through we hear Boris’s voice; it’s like being cornered in the Drones Club and harangued for hours by Bertie Wooster.

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