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John Travolta and Samuel L Jackson radiate effortless cool in Pulp Fiction.
Twenty years on, it’s time to admit that Pulp Fiction is a bad film
By Sam Moore - 20 October 12:47

It’s time we recognised that Quentin Tarantino’s much-lauded movie is about nothing, says nothing and makes you feel nothing.

Water: it's a mixer, you have it with whisky... Photo: Getty
Nina Caplan: It’s not our fault we’re a nation of bad drinkers
By Nina Caplan - 17 October 16:24

Most fizzy drinks are vile, yet some of those still do duty as mixers – the point here being, presumably, to cancel out one horrible taste with another.

Man of the old school: United manager Louis van Gaal (second from right) with his briefcase/note pad. Photo: Getty
Football, home to the lost art of handwriting. And other silly rituals
By Hunter Davies - 17 October 16:22

Hunter Davies’s weekly column, The Fan. 

Curious and curiouser: Fela Kuti on stage at Glastonbury in 1984. Photo: master_xpo/Flickr
For years, I wondered what Fela Kuti had really done to that man on stage
By Suzanne Moore - 17 October 15:39

Suzanne Moore’s weekly column, Telling Tales. 

Tanks for the memories: Brad Pitt and crew in Fury, a misfiring mix of horror and schmaltz
Belly of the beast: Brad Pitt’s new war movie veers from horror to schmaltz
By Ryan Gilbey - 17 October 15:18

For every stab at dirty realism in Fury, there is a sanitising touch to make everything clean again.

Cher wigs: but ITV's Great Fire fails to catch fire
Overblown vanilla awfulness: The Great Fire is more Great Farce
By Rachel Cooke - 17 October 11:00

With its 1990s Cher wigs, glossy modern make-up and Disneyfied London, even a lustful Samuel Pepys can’t save ITV’s The Great Fire. 

In the Frame: The Real Winners
By Tom Humberstone - 17 October 10:27

Tom Humberstone’s weekly comic.

Rebel road: remembering James Dean
By Antonia Quirke - 16 October 15:55

The tenderly shaped ten-minute broadcast included an interview with the California highway patrolman who had taken Dean to task over speeding. Two hours later, Dean was dead.

Thugs with thick skins: in Goodfellas (1990) De Niro boils over with conflicting emotions. Photo: Moviestorecollection.com
Mythical, merciless butchness: Martin Scorsese’s men
By Tom Shone - 16 October 15:48

From De Niro’s snarl to DiCaprio’s sinewy wildness, no director has explored masculinity as acutely as Scorsese, writes Tom Shone

Lost world: ruins of ancient sculptures litter the National Museum of Iraq in Baghdad. Photo: Yannis Kontos/Polaris/Eyevine
Treasure trails: how museums became diplomatic fixers
By Cristina Ruiz - 16 October 14:03

Museums were once places of scholarship – now they intervene in war zones and world politics.

A market stall in Bolton selling fruit and vegetables. Photo: Getty
How we get a taste for things and then forget how that happened
By Oliver Farry - 16 October 13:10

You are inclined to think that polenta and gnocchi, blinis and burritos have always been with us. But they are not part of our collective conscience as they would be for the people who grew up eating them.

The original cast of Ghostbusters.
Dad’s Army and Ghostbusters: how to reboot a beloved comedy without ruining it
By Ryan Gilbey - 16 October 12:31

The news that both a Dad’s Army film and Ghostbusters 3 are in the works is great for nostalgia fans. But how do you go about updating something well-loved without wrecking it?

Mistress of image: Debbie Harry, photographed on a trip to Britain by Chris Stein, c.1982
Picture this: the love affair between rockers and the lens
By James Medd - 16 October 10:00

From Deborah Harry to Ed Sheeran, four visual journeys through the lives of pop stars. 

Image problem: gay or straight, we are all actors. Image by Pacifico Silano, 'Male Fantasy' series
Damian Barr: Why do so many gay men hate camp men?
By Damian Barr - 16 October 10:00

Masc only”, “Str8 acting”, “Not into camp”. Strain your thumbs swiping Grindr and you’ll see a depressing amount of this prejudice. You’d think that, having been oppressed, we’d be more enlightened.

Woman and fiction: A portrait of Virginia Woolf, c. 1927. Photo: Getty
Women writers after Woolf: Still fighting for a room of one’s own
By Caroline Crampton - 16 October 10:00

Superficially, women who write fiction today seem to get equal billing with their male counterparts. Yet their work will never get the kind of avid coverage given to men. 

Shrewsbury School, Shropshire (2010), by Martin Parr
Suited and booted: Martin Parr’s chronicles of the Great White Male
By Martin Parr - 16 October 10:00

Martin Parr’s vision is simultaneously a celebration of the nuances of tribal behaviour and a gimlet-eyed stab at pretension and earnestness.

Top line: East Coast is Britain's best-run railway company. Photo: Bloomberg/Getty
Leviathan’s revenge: how Britain belongs to someone else
By Owen Jones - 16 October 10:00

James Meek’s superb new book exposes the perversities, hypocrisies and failures of privatisation.

Dog day afternoon: the Veuve Clicquot Gold Cup polo final at Cowdray Park, West Sussex. Photo: Jocelyn Bain Hogg/VII
Watching the Englishman: Kate Fox on the peculiar rituals of the privileged
By Kate Fox - 16 October 10:00

England’s upper-middle class pretend that class no longer matters. But try to infiltrate the tribe and you’ll see how strict the rules are, says anthropologist Kate Fox. 

Quids in: Jeff Koons poses for cameras at a preview for his retrospective at the Whitney in New York. Photo: Andrew Burton/Getty Images
Pop goes the easel: sharp encounters with contemporary artists
By Martin Gayford - 16 October 10:00

Are artists solitary individuals, or do they emerge from a workshop, family or other communities? In other words, are all works of art collective creations? Is an artist obliged to engage with politics or is it enough just to make good stuff?

Queen Viv: Westwood on the catwalk after her autumn/winter 2014/15 womenswear show at Paris Fashion Week in March. Photo: Getty
Punk, seams and SEX: the life and fashion of Vivienne Westwood
By Jane Shilling - 16 October 10:00

Jane Shilling reviews a new autobiography of the veteran British fashion designer and punk icon.

Everything is illuminated: Marilynne Robinson. Photo: Danny Wilcox Frazier/Redux/Eyevine
Living the good life: Rowan Williams on Marilynne Robinson
By Rowan Williams - 16 October 10:00

Robinson’s trilogy set in small-town Christian America is more than great fiction – it is a political and ethical project. 

Ancient and modern: solstice revellers celebrate sunrise at Stonehenge in June. Photo: Getty
Ancient watchfulness: searching for the spirit of place
By Erica Wagner - 16 October 10:00

Marsden examines the notion that there are places on the earth which chime mysteriously with the human spirit, which drew our ancestors to them just as we are drawn there.

Boys will be boys: as the Nineties progressed men's magazines "had only one button to press: sex". Photo: David Turner/Rex Features
Dylan Jones: The New Lad – my part in his downfall
By Dylan Jones - 16 October 10:00

Two decades ago, a new kind of man emerged intent on having it all. GQ editor Dylan Jones asks what happened to him.

“You can ride a canoe, but can you ride a yacht?” The Apprentice blog: series 10, episode 2
By Anoosh Chakelian - 16 October 8:29

It’s the second episode in a week of the new series of The Apprentice, meaning the producers have really given it 200 per cent.

Welcome to The Apprentice blog: series 10, episode 1
By Anoosh Chakelian - 15 October 8:27

The Apprentice is back for its 10th year. “You’re tired!” sums up the format, but dedicated viewers of the show won’t mind a bit.

Frontier town: Quito, Ecuador, seen shortly after a small earthquake, August 2014. Photo: Getty
Alone in the border town, I got a bit too nifty with the Spanish phrasebook
By Suzanne Moore - 14 October 16:42

Suzanne Moore’s weekly column, Telling Tales. 

Grayson Perry and Miranda Sawyer at the Royal Institution on 13 October.
Listen: Grayson Perry in conversation with Miranda Sawyer
By New Statesman - 14 October 15:24

On the idea of the “Great White Male”, politics, fashion and much more.

Gillian Anderson as DSI Stella Gibson in “The Fall”. Photo: BBC/The Fall 2 Limited/Helen Sloan
Is violence against women on TV acceptable if there are complex female characters?
By Clare Wiley - 14 October 11:57

Violent scenes on TV form part of a wider picture of how the media portrays women: as degraded, objectified and patronised victims.

Pucker up: Shahid Kapoor as Haider/Hamler and Shraddha Kapoor as Arshia/Ophelia
To pout or not to pout: Hamlet goes Bollywood
By Ryan Gilbey - 14 October 10:56

Bhardwaj relocates the action to Kashmir in the mid-1990s. If the graft doesn’t quite take, it’s because the film is so persuasive in portraying the oppression of the Kashmiri people that the woes of Hamlet seem small beer.

Bright stars: LiLo and Schiff in Speed-the-Plow
When Lindsay Lohan came out from behind the screen
By Mark Lawson - 14 October 10:00

Lindsay Lohan, in her music career, has little hope of earning the review “better than Madonna” but, in theatre, she empirically is.

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