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Elvis Presley c.1975. Photo: Getty
In 1970’s That’s The Way It Is, you get Elvis at his artistic peak
By Bob Stanley - 19 August 16:36

With this re-release of the 1970 documentary, the question is really how many different versions of “Suspicious Minds” you want in your life.

Care about feminist issues all the time, not just when someone is being abused on Twitter. Image: Keoni Cabral on Flickr via Creative Commons
But What Can Be Done: Dos and Don’ts To Combat Online Sexism
By Leigh Alexander - 19 August 12:26

Here’s a helpful guide to what you should and shouldn’t do if you see a woman being harassed on Twitter.

Chinese relations with the Soviets shaped the communist world during "de-Stalinisation", shaping too Kadare's period in Moscow
“A treacherous climate”: Ismail Kadare’s cold years in Moscow
By Robert Macquarie - 19 August 10:00

With a new translation of Twilight of the Eastern Gods, Ismail Kadare is finally receiving the recognition he deserves in the English-speaking world.

Get your geek on: crowds on the way into San Diego Comic-Con 2013. Photo: Getty
Where’s Wonder Woman? How comic book diversity has failed to translate to the big screen
By Karen Yossman - 18 August 16:38

With over 75 years of history, comics boast a multitude of inspirational female, black and even disabled characters. Superman is, at its heart, an immigrant tale, while X-Men is an allegory of the fight against fascism. 

Bill Clinton at a rally in 1996, the year he declared that “The era of big government is over”. Photo: Getty
Honey, I shrunk the government: a paean to the virtues of the small state
By George Eaton - 18 August 11:39

The authors argue that the west has no choice but to unfurl the banner of revolution again. The fiscal crisis and demographic changes have left treasuries creaking under the weight of debt. 

First World War Hero
By Danny Abse - 18 August 10:54

A new poem for the New Statesman by Danny Abse

Igor Stravinsky walking down a London street, between rehearsals with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra in 1964. Photo: Getty
Time out of mind: recollections from Stravinsky’s childhood
By Antonia Quirke - 18 August 10:00

His parents opposed the idea of him becoming a composer, pushing him bullishly towards the law. 

"Rock Me a Little While" by Kim Weston, a northern soul classic. Photo: Michael Sveikutis/Flickr
Tracey Thorn: With music, we often only hear the side of the story told by men
By Tracey Thorn - 15 August 16:11

When it comes to music such as northern soul, there is a tendency to regard men as the experts, relegating women’s stories of what it felt like to be there to the status of anecdote.

In the Frame: Boris Johnson in “The Man with Two Farces”
By Tom Humberstone - 15 August 12:56

Tom Humberstone’s weekly comic.

Decor at US drive-in Sonic is reminiscent of the retro-futurist style of The Jetsons. Photo: Getty
Come to “America’s Drive-In”, y’all – for tater tots and Jetsons decor
By Will Self - 15 August 11:44

At Sonic, the shtick is meant to be that the food arrives “at the speed of sound”; and the novelty in the late 1950s was that punters ordered their burgers and via speakers they could drive right up to.

England captain Alastair Cook (R) and teammate James Anderson walk off the pitch after defeating India in the fourth Test match between England and India, 9 August. Photo: Getty
The true meaning of success – and why we should never listen to the impatient mob
By Ed Smith - 15 August 11:07

After England’s defeat by India in the second Test at Lord’s, almost every leading voice in English cricket called for Alastair Cook to be sacked as captain. 

Michael Sheen and Lizzy Caplan in Masters of Sex. Photo: Showtime
Masters of Sex: a drama of sex, ambiguity and darkness
By Caroline Crampton - 14 August 16:25

This US cable drama about William Masters and Virginia Johnson, the American sex researchers who pioneered physiological study of human sexuality, just keeps getting better and better.

Stony-faced and sober: in the US in the 1900s the Anti-Saloon League made Prohibition a powerful force
Demon drink: how the hangover of prohibition lingers in Quebec
By Nina Caplan - 14 August 10:00

To this day, you can only buy wine in French Canada from the government-run outlets of the SAQ: the Société des alcools du Québec.

Pond life: a grey heron in a park in Ealing, west London. Photo: Getty
The silence of the larks: Britain’s mysterious disappearing birds
By Mark Cocker - 14 August 10:00

Britain’s avian population is the most watched in the world – but new studies show nature in retreat.

Magic number: a bar owner celebrates his big win near Barcelona, 2010
The day I (almost) won the lottery in Spain
By William Cook - 14 August 10:00

William Cook was on his way to buy a ticket for “El Gordo” in a small town in Tenerife but changed his mind at the last minute. It’s a decision he’s lived to regret. 

Ahead of the curve: Niterol Contemporary Art Museum in Rio de Janeiro by Oscar Niemeyer. Photo: Getty
Erotic architecture: the sexual history of great buildings
By Jonathan Glancey - 14 August 10:00

From Nero’s decadent Golden House in Rome to Charles Fourier’s orgiastic French “courts of love”; public toilet glory holes to Eileen Gray’s sexy Mediterranean hideway. 

The composer William Walton, photographed in 1965. Photo: Erich Auerbach/Getty
Proms 2014: the sound of silence in Walton’s Violin Concerto and Sibelius’s Fifth Symphony
By Caroline Crampton - 13 August 17:54

Performances by James Ehnes and the BBC National Orchestra of Wales had the Royal Albert Hall audience listening intently.

Lauren Bacall in 1951.
Lauren Bacall, leading lady of Hollywood’s Golden age, has died
By Caroline Crampton - 13 August 13:16

The star of To Have and Have Not and The Big Sleep has had a stroke aged 89. But did she always get the roles she deserved?

Playwright Samuel Beckett (1906-1989) embracing actor Jack McGowan at a first night performance, 1970. Photo: Getty
Mark Lawson: Happy days in the town of Samuel Beckett’s childhood
By Mark Lawson - 13 August 12:22

For the past three years, an international Beckett festival in Enniskillen has attempted to establish a more positive Google footprint alongside the one established by the IRA bombing at the town’s cenotaph in 1987.

Robin Williams as Tom Keating in Dead Poets Society
Remembering Robin Williams (1951-2014)
By New Statesman - 12 August 12:27

The American actor and comedian has been found dead at his home in California, aged 63.

Steven Isserlis performing with Joshua Bell and Marc-Andre Hamelin. Photo: Aline Paley
At the Verbier Festival, a lot of music is packed into a small town
By Alexandra Coghlan - 11 August 11:42

From Brahms’s chamber music to Mozart opera, the little Swiss ski-village provides a musical feast.

Clare Teal with the Count Pearson Proms Band & Duke Windsor Proms Band at the Battle of the Bands, BBC Proms 2014. Photo: BBC/Chris Christodoulou
Proms 2014: a triumphant blaze of 1930s jazz with Clare Teal's Battle of the Bands
By Caroline Crampton - 10 August 13:51

Clare Teal brought an imagined “jazz off” between the Duke Ellington and Count Basie bands to the Royal Albert Hall.

Life after death: Christie and Whishaw in Lilting
Lilting shows how language is not always a barrier to intimacy
By Ryan Gilbey - 08 August 16:15

Ben Whishaw stars as a grieving lover in this tale of cross-generational, Anglo-Chinese friendship. 

Baby blue: midwife Vicky (Christine Bottomley) in Kay Mellor's new drama
Soapy and box-ticking: Rachel Cooke on Kay Mellor’s In the Club
By Rachel Cooke - 08 August 16:13

This is a plot so grossly overloaded, so swollen with coincidences, that it makes EastEnders look lithe and minimalist.

Playing with Viola: Shakespeare in Love
Mark Lawson: From Wolfgang to Will, there’s no such thing as a full-time genius
By Mark Lawson - 08 August 15:30

In Shakespeare in Love, he is more Bart than Bard: a feckless, penniless hack dramatist with writer’s block who has terrible ideas for plays – “Romeo and Ethel, the Pirate’s Daughter”.

Paul Ready.
There are no clear answers in Channel 4’s conspiracy thriller Utopia
By Charlie Royle - 08 August 15:19

Channel 4’s Utopia is a complex and unpredictable thriller which refuses to give easy answers on the challenges of population growth.

Old-school grubbiness: the return of Sinéad O’Connor
Sinead O’Connor’s lively, messy and contradictory version of feminism
By Kate Mossman - 08 August 12:09

A concept album of sorts, this claims to chart the emotional experiences of an imaginary woman – from romantic activities to pain, deception and more.

In the Frame: The Road To Election Day Board Game
By Tom Humberstone - 08 August 10:31

Tom Humberstone’s weekly comic.

Caillebotte, Les Raboteurs de parquet
Toil and tedium: how painting remains coy about its painstaking processes
By Oliver Farry - 07 August 14:57

Everyone knows the effort that goes into creating works of art but it is all sublimated in a seamless, effortless whole. 

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