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9/11 ten years on: what the public think now

45 per cent believe that a terrorist attack is either likely or very likely in the UK in the next ye

Tomorrow's New Statesman is a special issue marking the 10th anniversary of the 11 September, 2001 attacks. In conjunction with the issue, we commissioned a special poll from ICD Research on the subject, the results of which appear below.

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Asked if they feel safer now than on 10 September 2001, just 21 per cent said they felt less safe (14 per cent) or much less safe (7 per cent). 13 per cent said they felt slightly more safe (8 per cent) or much more safe (5 per cent). The majority (66 per cent) said they felt no different.

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Ten years on from 9/11 and six years on from 7/7, a large number of people believe that a terrorist attack is likely in the UK in the next year. 45 per cent said that an attack was either likely (37 per cent) or very likely (8 per cent), compared to 16 per cent who said that an attack was unlikely (13 per cent) or most unlikely (3 per cent). 39 per cent said that an attack was neither likely or unlikely.

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Asked if they were more fearful of home grown or foreign terrorists, 49 per cent said the former and 21 per cent said the latter. Those aged 55 and over are most fearful of home grown terrorists (61.8 per cent) and those aged 25-34 are least fearful (32 per cent).

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Finally, asked if they considered 9/11 to be the biggest news event of their lives, 45.5 per cent said yes and 54.5 per cent said no. Those aged 55 and over were least likely to say that the attacks were the biggest news event of their lives (63.6 per cent). Conversely, those aged 25-34 were most likely to say that 9/11 was the biggest news event of their lives (53.1 per cent), followed by those aged 18-24 (52.4 per cent).

This exclusive poll for the New Statesman was carried out by ICD Research, powered by ID Factor, from 27-28 August 2011 and is based on a sample of 1,000 responses