Diane Abbott enters Labour leadership race

Hackney North and Stoke Newington MP makes surprise announcement that she will be the sixth person t

Diane Abbott has thrown her hat into the ring, announcing that she will stand for the Labour leadership.

The MP for Hackney North and Stoke Newington told the BBC's Today programme that her bid was "serious", and would offer Labour a choice, given the similarities between the other candidates.

This unexpected addition certainly brings something different to a race which, until now, was populated mainly by white, Oxbridge-educated men in their forties -- Ed and David Miliband, Ed Balls and Andy Burnham all fit the bill, while John McDonnell is 59, and went to Brunel.

Abbott says she is confident that she will gain the necessary backing of 33 Labour MPs by 27 May, expecting support from MPs on the left of the party, and from women MPs.

Abbott -- a 57-year-old Cambridge graduate -- was the UK's first black female MP in 1987, and remained the only one for ten years.

Quite apart from being a black woman entering the fray in a very white, male political setting, she represents a more left-leaning set of ideas than the candidates already in the running, many of whom are still tarred by their lingering association with Blair/Brown.

She is generally to the left of New Labour, and as a long-standing member of the party's Socialist Campaign Group, she stands a chance of garnering support from those MPs disappointed that Jon Cruddas ruled himself out.

If nothing else, this looks set to be an interesting contest.

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Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.