The New Statesman’s rolling politics blog

RSS

This week's New Statesman: faith, science and belief

50 greatest political photographs | Terry Eagleton on evil | Slavoj Žižek on religion.

god-5:NS.qxd

This week's New Statesman, a special collector's double issue for Easter, looks at faith, science and what we believe today. John Cornwell begins our coverage by looking at the child abuse scandal that has engulfed the Catholic Church. He writes that it may become the greatest catastrophe to afflict the Church since the Reformation.

Elsewhere, the philosopher Slavoj Žižek argues that religion remains a potentially revolutionary force and admires the radicalism of St Paul. Meanwhile, following the return of the Bulger case to the front pages, the literary critic Terry Eagleton explores the meaning of evil and asks whether we need religion to explain the ills of the world.

In the columns, Steve Richards challenges David Cameron's claim to have changed the Conservative Party; David Blanchflower argues that now is no time to go on strike; Peter Kellner explains why the polls are narrowing; and Mehdi Hasan responds to news that Simon Cowell may convert to Islam.

In The Critics, Michael Rosen visits the reopened Jewish Museum; A C Grayling reviews a new study of the origins of religion; David Belton looks at the resurrection of Tiger Woods; and Will Self explores the popularity of the charity sponsored event.

Also don't miss our remarkable free magazine on the 50 greatest political photographs of all time, featuring selections by John Pilger, Jon Snow and Jonathan Dimbleby.

The issue is on sale now, or you can subscribe through the website.

Sign up now to Comment Plus for the pick of the day's opinion, comment and analysis in your inbox at 8am.