Cameron shamelessly compares himself to Obama

Tory leader compares his vision with the US President's.

Nick Clegg may have been accused of sounding rather like a certain US politician recently (all those references to "hope" and "change") but David Cameron has just taken Obama mimicry to a whole new level.

Here's how he ended his speech on the "broken society" today:

Inspired by the Big Society, not crushed by the effects of big government. Based on hope, optimism and faith in each other. Not rules, regulations and fear of each other. This is what Barack Obama called the audacity of hope. Now it is our turn to dare to believe that we can change our world. Together. All of us. So let's do it.

I think it's safe to assume that Obama, who opposed the Iraq war, supports "spreading the wealth" and believes in the power of government, does not believe that Cameron, who backed the war, plans to cut tax for the rich and believes, absurdly, that "big government" caused the financial crisis, is fit to claim his mantle.

Indeed, on policy areas from Lords reform ("a third-term issue" for Cameron) to the voting system, the Tory leader is not the candidate of change but the candidate of the status quo.

In any case, is it not an indictment of the right that Cameron now attempts to improve his image by comparing himself to a left-liberal politician? It's as good a reminder as any that this is a progressive, not a conservative moment.

 

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George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.