Amis: I wish my sister had converted to Islam

Novelist accused of Islamophobia says the religion could have saved his sister.

Martin Amis came close to making an apology for his previous comments about Islam at the Dubai Festival of Literature last week. Interviewed for the National, the region's excellent English-language newspaper, Amis declared that he wished his late sister Sally, an alcoholic who died in 2000, had converted to Islam instead of Catholicism.

"She might still be alive because of the continence of Islam, the austerity, the demands it makes on you," he said. "I just sort of helplessly think it every now and then. She would only be 56 now and she'd still be here."

He also goes into detail about why he thinks "Islamism" is a "useless word" and clarifies just what he has said in the past that has led some to brand him an Islamophobe and a racist.

You can find the full article here.

The National also reports that on stage, in conversation with the broadcaster Paul Blezard, Amis added: "More than 95 per cent of Muslims are horrified by this ridiculous, nihilistic wing and should not be connected verbally or otherwise with these extremists," and that he "respected Muhammad, not Mohammed Atta", referring to one of the 11 September 2001 attackers.

His detractors may not feel that any of these statements lets Amis off the hook. But, as the interview shows, he is evidently keen to clear up a host of misconceptions about himself. At least the vexed question of his teeth didn't come up . . .

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Sholto Byrnes is a Contributing Editor to the New Statesman
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Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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