Google launches its own UK credit card

The Bank of Google is open for business.

With the announcement of the “Adwords Business Credit Card”, Google has officially entered the credit industry.

After a successful year-long pilot scheme in the United States, Google has teamed up with Barclays to issue MasterCard credit cards usable exclusively on purchases of Adwords – the small adverts that appear on the site’s search engine.

The initiative is primarily intended to help its customers finance these purchases through offering credit ranging from $200 (aprx £125) to $100,000 (aprx £62,000) a month at a highly competitive rate of 11.9 per cent. The exact terms can be found here.

The pilot scheme revealed that the service led to significant growth in advertising purchases, with 74 per cent of respondents using the Adwords card. Google expects that the full deployment of its credit scheme will produce a multiplier effect that will encourage customers to allocate an increasing share of their marketing budget to Google Adwords.

Google treasurer Brent Callinicos revealed as much in an interview the FT, declaring that Google was “not trying to run the financing business as a profit centre”, solely as a lubricant to stimulate advertising investment.

Google began inviting small and medium sized business to join the program from Sunday.

In partnership with Comenity Capital Bank, a similar credit card will be released in the United States in the upcoming weeks with an 8.99 per cent rate of interest.

This isn’t the first time a technology giant has made a foray into financial services: Apple offers financing through its own Visa, whilst Amazon launched its own credit initiative last week to independent sellers wanting to list products at the Amazon Marketplace.

Photo: AFP/Getty

Alex Ward is a London-based freelance journalist who has previously worked for the Times & the Press Association. Twitter: @alexward3000

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An alternative Trainspotting script for John Humphrys’ Radio 4 “Choose Life” tribute

Born chippy.

Your mole often has Radio 4’s Today programme babbling away comfortingly in the background while emerging blinking from the burrow. So imagine its horror this morning, when the BBC decided to sully this listening experience with John Humphrys doing the “Choose Life” monologue from Trainspotting.

“I chose not to choose life: I chose something else. And the reasons? There are no reasons. Who needs reasons when you’ve got Radio 4?” he concluded, as a nation cringed.

Introduced as someone who has “taken issue with modernity”, Humphrys launched into the film character Renton’s iconic rant against the banality of modern life.

But Humphrys’ role as in-studio curmudgeon is neither endearing nor amusing to this mole. Often tasked with stories about modern technology and digital culture by supposedly mischievous editors, Humphrys sounds increasingly cranky and ill-informed. It doesn’t exactly make for enlightening interviews. So your mole has tampered with the script. Here’s what he should have said:

“Choose life. Choose a job and then never retire, ever. Choose a career defined by growling and scoffing. Choose crashing the pips three mornings out of five. Choose a fucking long contract. Choose interrupting your co-hosts, politicians, religious leaders and children. Choose sitting across the desk from Justin Webb at 7.20 wondering what you’re doing with your life. Choose confusion about why Thought for the Day is still a thing. Choose hogging political interviews. Choose anxiety about whether Jim Naughtie’s departure means there’s dwindling demand for grouchy old men on flagship political radio shows. Choose a staunch commitment to misunderstanding stories about video games and emoji. Choose doing those stories anyway. Choose turning on the radio and wondering why the fuck you aren’t on on a Sunday morning as well. Choose sitting on that black leather chair hosting mind-numbing spirit-crushing game shows (Mastermind). Choose going over time at the end of it all, pishing your last few seconds on needlessly combative questions, nothing more than an obstacle to that day’s editors being credited. Choose your future. Choose life . . .”

I'm a mole, innit.