EasyJet's linking policy bans you from using the colour orange

Luckily, we don't link to easyJet.

Yesterday, I mentioned easyJet's 2004 squabble with Orange over the colour orange:

The Easy conglomerate, owners of the travel company easyJet, uses Pantone 021C, but famously got into trouble with the mobile phone company Orange – which has trademarked the similar shade Pantone 151C – when it started easyMobile in 2004.

EasyJet hasn't backed down over that claim in the intervening eight years. If anything, they've gone in harder.

Their linking policy – which I'm not linking to because, well, you'll see – bans anyone "linking to the easyJet Website by any means" from using the colour Orange. At all:

3.3 You agree that you shall not use the colour orange (pantone reference 021C, HTML reference #FF6600) on your Website except as part of an easyJet Trade Mark used as permitted in clause 3.1 above.

The policy also bans you from linking to anywhere on the site other than the homepage:

4.1 You are permitted to provide and maintain a Link to the easyJet Website Homepage only at URL http://www.easyjet.com. You may not direct the Link to any other webpage contained within the easyJet Website.

Of course, such policies have been around for ages. But I've not yet seen one which claims ownership over an entire colour.

EastJet Orange.

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.