Paper money and the hidden economy

Governments are looking to cut down on paper cash

 

Not many builders accept credit cards - for some reason they really don't like having all those receipts lying around. It isn't just the super-rich who are causing HMRC problems with their tax avoidance strategies. The so-called "hidden economy" is an equally big problem for governments across the world. And it is that untraceable folding money that enables it.

As such, governments with the biggest economic problems are increasingly looking to cut cash in circulation and encourage the use of electronic payments.

In Italy tax evasion is estimated to be 22 per cent of GDP. Part of Mario Monti's economic reforms agenda has been designed to reduce the amount of cash in system by increasing the volume of electronic payments made at the point of sale. In practice, this means imposing a cap on merchant service fees - the processing charges retailers are required to pay on card transactions. The more people use electronic payment methods, the harder it is to hide from the tax man.

The Italian government hopes to win the support of the retailers in encouraging consumers to use their cards more regularly. Winning that support is not easy - retailers like cash in their pockets like everyone else. That is why many smaller retailers still impose minimum spends for customers wishing to use their cards. But the advent of contactless payments is changing that, and in the UK, many high-volume, low value retailers (like cafes) are now encouraging people to "tap and go", even for purchases of £1 or £2.

Some governments around the world have their work cut out in the war on cash, even by Italian standards.

For the banking and payments sector Nigeria is one of the world's biggest boom markets. Debit cards and electronic payments are big business out there as the government faces the seemingly impossible task of cracking down on corruption.

This is certainly a difficult task in a country that runs on brown envelope deals, and has a reputation as a breeding ground for internet scammers. But no-one can accuse the government of half measures. The Central Bank of Nigeria is seemingly unphased and unstoppable. Arrests of senior bankers is a regular and high-profile. And unlike the Italians, they aren't interested in incentivising people to move to electronic payments methods. Their methods are altogether more direct, replacing the carrot with the stick Huge penalties are being levied on cash withdrawals of over NGN150,000 (£600) at ATMs. Businesses accepting cash payments of more than NGN 1m (£4,000) are being charged 20 per cent for the privilege. The initial results have been mixed, but what is certain is that Nigeria's government is fighting fire with fire.

 

 

Paper money: up for destruction? Getty images

James Ratcliff is Group Editor of  Cards and Payments at VRL Financial News.

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Theresa May's offer to EU citizens leaves the 3 million with unanswered questions

So many EU citizens, so little time.

Ahead of the Brexit negotiations with the 27 remaining EU countries, the UK government has just published its pledges to EU citizens living in the UK, listing the rights it will guarantee them after Brexit and how it will guarantee them. The headline: all 3 million of the country’s EU citizens will have to apply to a special “settled status” ID card to remain in the UK after it exist the European Union.

After having spent a year in limbo, and in various occasions having been treated by the same UK government as bargaining chips, this offer will leave many EU citizens living in the UK (this journalist included) with more questions than answers.

Indisputably, this is a step forward. But in June 2017 – more than a year since the EU referendum – it is all too little, too late. 

“EU citizens are valued members of their communities here, and we know that UK nationals abroad are viewed in the same way by their host countries.”

These are words the UK’s EU citizens needed to hear a year ago, when they woke up in a country that had just voted Leave, after a referendum campaign that every week felt more focused on immigration.

“EU citizens who came to the UK before the EU Referendum, and before the formal Article 50 process for exiting the EU was triggered, came on the basis that they would be able to settle permanently, if they were able to build a life here. We recognise the need to honour that expectation.”

A year later, after the UK’s Europeans have experienced rising abuse and hate crime, many have left as a result and the ones who chose to stay and apply for permanent residency have seen their applications returned with a letter asking them to “prepare to leave the country”, these words seem dubious at best.

To any EU citizen whose life has been suspended for the past year, this is the very least the British government could offer. It would have sounded a much more sincere offer a year ago.

And it almost happened then: an editorial in the Evening Standard reported last week that Theresa May, then David Cameron’s home secretary, was the reason it didn’t. “Last June, in the days immediately after the referendum, David Cameron wanted to reassure EU citizens they would be allowed to stay,” the editorial reads. “All his Cabinet agreed with that unilateral offer, except his Home Secretary, Mrs May, who insisted on blocking it.” 

"They will need to apply to the Home Office for permission to stay, which will be evidenced through a residence document. This will be a legal requirement but there is also an important practical reason for this. The residence document will enable EU citizens (and their families) living in the UK to demonstrate to third parties (such as employers or providers of public services) that they have permission to continue to live and work legally in the UK."

The government’s offer lacks details in the measures it introduces – namely, how it will implement the registration and allocation of a special ID card for 3 million individuals. This “residence document” will be “a legal requirement” and will “demonstrate to third parties” that EU citizens have “permission to continue to live and work legally in the UK.” It will grant individuals ““settled status” in UK law (indefinite leave to remain pursuant to the Immigration Act 1971)”.

The government has no reliable figure for the EU citizens living in the UK (3 million is an estimation). Even “modernised and kept as smooth as possible”, the administrative procedure may take a while. The Migration Observatory puts the figure at 140 years assuming current procedures are followed; let’s be optimistic and divide by 10, thanks to modernisation. That’s still 14 years, which is an awful lot.

To qualify to receive the settled status, an individual must have been resident in the UK for five years before a specified (although unspecified by the government at this time) date. Those who have not been a continuous UK resident for that long will have to apply for temporary status until they have reached the five years figure, to become eligible to apply for settled status.

That’s an application to be temporarily eligible to apply to be allowed to stay in the UK. Both applications for which the lengths of procedure remain unknown.

Will EU citizens awaiting for their temporary status be able to leave the country before they are registered? Before they have been here five years? How individuals will prove their continuous employment or housing is undisclosed – what about people working freelance? Lodgers? Will proof of housing or employment be enough, or will both be needed?

Among the many other practicalities the government’s offer does not detail is the cost of such a scheme, although it promises to “set fees at a reasonable level” – which means it will definitely not be free to be an EU citizen in the UK (before Brexit, it definitely was.)

And the new ID will replace any previous status held by EU citizens, which means even holders of permanent citizenship will have to reapply.

Remember that 140 years figure? Doesn’t sound so crazy now, does it?

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