WikiLeaks nominated for Nobel Peace Prize

The whistleblowing website is one of 241 nominees for the annual award.

The whistleblowing website WikiLeaks has today been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize.

The nomination comes after a stellar year for the anti-secrecy site, which became a household name after releasing the Afghanistan and Iraq war logs and, more recently, more than 250,000 US diplomatic cables.

In recent months, however, an increasing number of allegations against the website's founder, Julian Assange, have overshadowed the site's achievements.

Today's announcement comes just days after Assange lost his fight against extradition to Sweden, to face allegations of rape and sexual molestation. New allegations also appeared today in Private Eye, which claims that Assange blames his plight on three journalists – Alan Rusbridger, David Leigh and the former editor of the New Statesman John Kampfner – all of whom, Assange claimed falsely, "were Jewish".

The other nominees for the prize include the Afghan rights advocate Sima Samar, the European Union, the former German chancellor Helmut Kohl, the Cuban dissident Oswaldo Paya Sardinas, and the Russian rights group Memorial as well as its founder, Svetlana Gannushkina.

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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.