Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

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1. The arts are more than a way to make money, Maria Miller (Observer)

The culture minister tells Hull what a financial boon being City of Culture will be. She's missing the point, writes Catherine Bennett.

2. Thanks to Paul Flowers, expect politics to get ugly again (Sunday Telegraph)

There was tacit agreement that politicians’ past indiscretions were a private matter, says Matthew D'Ancona, but the gloves could be off for the election in 2015.

3. Needed fast: a human face on the invisible crime of modern slavery (Sunday Times) (£)

Slavery is back, in the country that so proudly abolished it 180 years ago, writes Camilla Cavendish.

4. David Cameron demeans his office (Independent on Sunday)

Ed Miliband: The Conservatives’ tactics of fear and smear raise serious questions about type of politics we want.

5. How can banking still be a source of scandal so long after the crash? (Observer)

There are alarming signs that people are behaving as if there were nothing really to learn from the bubble years, says Andrew Rawnsley.

6. Tory smearing of Labour is vilest form of politics - and all because they are in a mess (Mirror)

We’re set for one of the dirtiest election campaigns this country has seen, says Owen Jones, writing as a guest columnist.

7. Yes, we do need to change the age of consent. To 35. (Independent on Sunday)

The first pleasure of bodily love isn’t penetration - it's disobedience, says Howard Jacobson.

8. Pulling off these two deals might just rescue President Knife Edge (Sunday Times) (£)

The Obama presidency — like the Nixon, Reagan, Clinton and Bush presidencies before it — is now in a severe second-term crisis, writes Andrew O'Sullivan.

9. Self-improving strivers need rewarding, too (Sunday Telegraph)

Janet Daley: Bizarrely, only the truly rich and the truly poor have had their income tax cut

10. Universities should be the last place to ban free speech (Observer)

The censorship of an atheist bookstall at freshers' week is just another example of heavy-handed repression in our universities, writes Nick Cohen.