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20 March 2020updated 04 Sep 2021 10:18am

Live data on the coronavirus crisis – all you need to know

This page will use a combination of live data and regular updates to offer relevant figures on Covid-19 in the UK and the wider world.

By Ben Walker

Key points:

  • UK rate of deaths continue to outpace that of France and Italy, the latter of which now with more than 10,000 fatalities.
  • Older Covid-19 cases are far more likely to need critical care. Read more
  • Boris Johnson tests positive for coronavirus. Read more

Summary: United Kingdom

Known cases of coronavirus in Britain continue to grow at rates similar to its European neighbours. Cases have so far been concentrated in urban and commuter areas, particularly London.

New fatality data shows the rate of UK deaths, however, outpacing that of Italy and France, but moving at a slower speed than Spain.

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Cases across Britain are reported in two ways. In England they’re reported by unitary local authorities, and in Scotland and Wales they’re reported by NHS health boards.

Known cases appear to be highest in the London boroughs, major cities and their commuter-belt areas. However, these higher figures should also be considered in terms of what else we know about health reporting. For example, the figures are lower in counties where most residents already rate their health as poorer than the national average. Some people in these areas may be misattributing symptoms, or a lower general standard of health literacy may make them less likely to ask for testing.

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This page will be updated as more data becomes available.

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