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23 September 2015updated 12 Oct 2023 11:16am

New polling data shows the challenge facing Jeremy Corbyn

Exclusive YouGov research for the New Statesman shows how Corbyn's support base crucially differs from Labour's target voters.

By Peter Kellner

Successful party leaders marry the enthusiasms of their supporters to the mood of the wider electorate. By this test, Jeremy Corbyn looks destined to fail. Exclusive YouGov research for the New Statesman finds that the two groups are divided by a gulf that is unprecedented in modern British politics.

Those who voted for Jeremy Corbyn overwhelmingly describe themselves as left-wing. They reject capitalism, and they admire Tony Benn more than they admire Tony Blair. Two-thirds of them want to abolish private schools and the monarchy, and favour higher taxes to pay for greater welfare.

Labour’s target voters think none of these things. Nor do many current Labour supporters. The table gives the main findings. The first column sets out the views of those who voted for Corbyn to be party leader. The final three columns are taken from a separate survey of more than 10,000 electors. Currently, just over a quarter would vote Labour; a further 20 per cent would consider doing so. To win in 2020, Labour must retain the support of almost all its present supporters and at least half its potential voters.

Our figures show how hard this will be. While 81 per cent of those who voted for Corbyn say they are “very” or “fairly” left-wing, a mere 15 per cent of potential Labour voters and 25 per cent of “weak” supporters do so. (“Firm” supporters are those who identify fairly strongly or strongly with the party: “weak” supporters would vote Labour now but don’t identify strongly with it.)

Should Corbyn tack to the centre and compromise on his long-held views? He has already performed U-turns on a number of issues, such as Europe. He accepts that abolishing the monarchy will have to wait.

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However, if he abandons the beliefs he has embraced for more than 30 years, he faces a double risk. On the one hand, the people he needs to attract may reject him as a cynical leader, hiding his true feelings to win votes; on the other hand, those who voted for him may accuse him of betraying the very principles that he proclaimed so clearly in his leadership campaign.

Corbyn’s other option, of course, is to hold firm to his views, make the case for red-blooded socialism, and persuade millions of voters to back his crusade. If he truly believes in it, he should do so – and set out to prove me wrong.

The data
 

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This article appears in the 23 Sep 2015 issue of the New Statesman, Revenge of the Left