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12 August 2013updated 22 Oct 2020 3:55pm

5 questions answered on the fracking comments

According to Cameron,"fracking is safe."

By Heidi Vella

Five questions answered on PM David Cameron’s recent fracking comments

Writing in The Daily Telegraph, UK Prime Minister, David Cameron, has outlined why he thinks people must accept fracking in the UK countryside. We answer five questions on his comments.

What are the key points made by David Cameron in his article?

The Prime Minister wrote the article to speak out in favour of fracking. He said: “fracking has real potential to drive energy bills down”, adding that it will create jobs, bring money to local neighbourhoods and that “local people will not be cut out and ignored.”

What about the potential damage to the environment, did he address this issue? 

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Yes. According to Cameron,”fracking is safe.” He says: “International evidence shows there is no reason why the process should cause contamination of water supplies or other environmental damage, if properly regulated.” He added that: “I would never sanction something that might ruin our landscapes and scenery.”

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What about the North/South issue, where will fracking take place?

Cameron, who is no doubt keen to repair damage done by his father-in-law and former government advisor, Lord Howell of Guildford, who said a few weeks ago that gas fracking should be confined to the North East because it was full of “large and uninhabited and desolate areas,” confirmed that fracking should take place in both the South and North of England and not just in certain parts of Britain as has been suggested.

He said: “This is wrong. I want all parts of our nation to share in the benefits: north or south, Conservative or Labour. We are all in this together.”

What did he say are the benefits of fracking to local communities?

Cameron laid out the benefits fracking could bring to local communities.

“Fracking will bring money to local neighbourhoods,” he said

“Companies have agreed to pay £100,000 to every community situated near an exploratory well where they’re looking to see if shale gas exists. If gas is then extracted, 1 per cent of the revenue – perhaps as much as £10m – will go straight back to residents who live nearby.”

He added that this money could be used for reduction in council tax bills or invested in neighbourhood schools.

What have those against fracking said?

Tim Farron, president of the Liberal Democrat party in coalition government with Cameron’s Conservatives, has said fracking may damage rural areas.

He told The Sunday Telegraph earlier in the month: I am afraid the Government has seen flashing pound signs, and has not considered the long-term threats fracking poses to the countryside.

“I think this is a very short-sighted policy, and we will all be left to live with the consequences.”

He added: “This technology can lead to earth tremors and I’m particularly worried that buried nuclear waste in my part of the country could be affected. We should be investing more in renewable fuels.”