Support 100 years of independent journalism.

  1. Business
3 December 2012

By paying extra tax Starbucks is doing exactly the wrong thing

A "moral taxation" system would be deeply weird.

By Martha Gill

So Starbucks has caved to public pressure and opted to pay more tax. It doesn’t have to – it has paid its legal dues – but is chosing to, as a moral gesture, in order to appease public anger. It is also trying to appease MPs, who have been keen to tap into this public anger by declaring tax avoidance “morally repugnant”.

Good thought, but any “moral repugnance” is in the tax laws they themselves continue to approve. No actual changes in legislation have been planned. Instead the government has opted to pressure companies not staying within the “spirit of the law” in a £77m crackdown.

This is odd. When government spots something “immoral” going on that is not yet illegal, common practice is to change the law (rather than simply moralise). It’s also common practice for companies make money by working out how they can cut costs while staying within the letter of the law.

If these practices are abandoned, a deeply strange system starts to emerge. Namely, a tax system which relies on public pressure to a few high profile firms. This looks unappetisingly vague and inconsistent to outsiders. As Alex Henderson from PWC told City AM:

“It is important that we have stability and simplicity in the tax regime if the UK is to attract foreign firms – if there is uncertainty in the system that is concerning.”

Sign up for The New Statesman’s newsletters Tick the boxes of the newsletters you would like to receive. A weekly newsletter helping you fit together the pieces of the global economic slowdown. Quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics from the New Statesman's politics team. The New Statesman’s global affairs newsletter, every Monday and Friday. The best of the New Statesman, delivered to your inbox every weekday morning. The New Statesman’s weekly environment email on the politics, business and culture of the climate and nature crises - in your inbox every Thursday. Our weekly culture newsletter – from books and art to pop culture and memes – sent every Friday. A weekly round-up of some of the best articles featured in the most recent issue of the New Statesman, sent each Saturday. A newsletter showcasing the finest writing from the ideas section and the NS archive, covering political ideas, philosophy, criticism and intellectual history - sent every Wednesday. Sign up to receive information regarding NS events, subscription offers & product updates.

Admittedly, there are a few places where simply urging people to keep to the “spirit of the law” works – places like China, where laws are occasionally kept vague (but with huge penalties) to scare people into behaving extra well. It may not work so well here.

Content from our partners
“I learn something new on every trip"
How data can help revive our high streets in the age of online shopping
Why digital inclusion is a vital piece of levelling up