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14 June 2012

Banks: worth robbing? The numbers crunched.

Turns out robbery is a modest career.

By Martha Gill

Knowing how tough times are, economists have kindly conducted an investigation into whether or not it’s worth robbing a bank.

They find that, statistically,  it’s not. It turns out bank robbery is the kind of career you go in to for the love, the fame and the thrills, not the money. Here are Barry Reilly, Neil Rickman and Robert Witt:

The return on an average bank robbery is, frankly, rubbish. It is not unimaginable wealth. It is a very modest £12 706.60 per person per raid. Indeed, it is so low that it is not worth the banks’ while to spend as little as £4500 per cashier position at every branch on rising screens to deter them.

A single bank raid, even a successful one, is not going to keep our would-be robber in a life of luxury. It is not going to keep him long in a life of any kind. Given that the average UK wage for those in full-time employment is around £26 000, it will give him a modest lifestyle for no more than 6 months.

If he decides to make a career of it, and robs two banks a year to make a sub-average income, his chances of eventually getting caught will increase: at 0.8 probability per raid, after three raids or a year and a half his odds of remaining at large are 0.8 × 0.8 × 0.8 = 0.512; after four raids he is more likely than not to be inside. As a profitable occupation, bank robbery leaves a lot to be desired.

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So crime doesn’t pay (all that much). But a few things can help. It’s good to stay British – a run on an American bank only fetches an average of $4,330. It also helps to have a firearm handy – gun point robberies raise average haul by £10,300.50 – though this comes with increased penalties should something go wrong. And it does go wrong fairly frequently – nearly half of all bank robberies fail, either at the time or through the subsequent efforts of the law. As a result, the researchers note:

Robbing banks is no longer what you could call the crime of choice. Bank robberies and attempted bank robberies have been decreasing……..robberies from security vans are on the increase. Security vans offer more attractive pickings.

They conclude that potential thieves should try to think more carefully about economics. “Statistics can help in all walks of life.”