Support 100 years of independent journalism.

  1. Politics
30 September 2010updated 27 Sep 2015 2:12am

Rise of Sarah Palin’s “mama grizzlies”

Exclusive: why Tory MPs Nadine Dorries and Louise Bagshawe love Palin power

By Sophie Elmhirst

In my article in this week’s magazine on the growing phenomenon of conservative women’s movements in the US (which will be published in full on the site on Monday), two Tory MPs reveal their admiration for Sarah Palin and her troupe of “mama grizzlies” in the Tea Party:

Nadine Dorries MP says, “I think Sarah Palin is amazing. I totally admire her.”

Louise Bagshawe MP describes Palin as a “remarkable figure”: “I watched her acceptance speech at the Republican party conference and it seemed to me that it was a glorious moment, a birth of a new political star.”

Bagshawe also identifies closely with Palin’s socially conservative agenda. Here’s a short extract from the piece:

Select and enter your email address Quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics from the New Statesman's politics team. A weekly newsletter helping you fit together the pieces of the global economic slowdown. The New Statesman’s global affairs newsletter, every Monday and Friday. The best of the New Statesman, delivered to your inbox every weekday morning. The New Statesman’s weekly environment email on the politics, business and culture of the climate and nature crises - in your inbox every Thursday. Our weekly culture newsletter – from books and art to pop culture and memes – sent every Friday. A weekly round-up of some of the best articles featured in the most recent issue of the New Statesman, sent each Saturday. A newsletter showcasing the finest writing from the ideas section and the NS archive, covering political ideas, philosophy, criticism and intellectual history - sent every Wednesday. Sign up to receive information regarding NS events, subscription offers & product updates.
  • Administration / Office
  • Arts and Culture
  • Board Member
  • Business / Corporate Services
  • Client / Customer Services
  • Communications
  • Construction, Works, Engineering
  • Education, Curriculum and Teaching
  • Environment, Conservation and NRM
  • Facility / Grounds Management and Maintenance
  • Finance Management
  • Health - Medical and Nursing Management
  • HR, Training and Organisational Development
  • Information and Communications Technology
  • Information Services, Statistics, Records, Archives
  • Infrastructure Management - Transport, Utilities
  • Legal Officers and Practitioners
  • Librarians and Library Management
  • Management
  • Marketing
  • OH&S, Risk Management
  • Operations Management
  • Planning, Policy, Strategy
  • Printing, Design, Publishing, Web
  • Projects, Programs and Advisors
  • Property, Assets and Fleet Management
  • Public Relations and Media
  • Purchasing and Procurement
  • Quality Management
  • Science and Technical Research and Development
  • Security and Law Enforcement
  • Service Delivery
  • Sport and Recreation
  • Travel, Accommodation, Tourism
  • Wellbeing, Community / Social Services
I consent to New Statesman Media Group collecting my details provided via this form in accordance with the Privacy Policy

Like some of her American sisters, Bagshawe is also anti-abortion. “I’ve never had a problem with being pro-life and a feminist,” she says. “I don’t consider them to be at all incompatible.” She reveals that she is a member of a prominent US pro-life lobby group, Feminists For Life.

Dorries, meanwhile, would like to see a similar kind of uprising of stay-at-home, conservative mothers in the UK: “Do you know the people who have no voice in this country? Who are never written about, who journalists never talk about? The mums. Mums who decide that they will give up their careers and stay at home and look after their children.”

From the piece:

Dorries says she has been inspired by recent events in the US – the primary victories of O’Donnell and others. With a new government in place, she senses a “wind of change” in the political atmosphere in Britain. In the last parliament, she says, it was “very difficult to talk about the family unit, and to talk about mothers and children . . . as the foundation of society, because it was seen as a very unsexy, untrendy thing to do and the opposite of what a woman should be doing”. Given the sympathetic political climate, she sees an opportunity to mobilise a perceived constituency of ignored, stay-at-home mothers. “I think it’s time somebody started to represent those mums,” she says.

Read the full piece in this week’s magazine, out today.