Support 100 years of independent journalism.

  1. Culture
10 November 2012

Philip Roth calls time on his literary career

The American novelist announces that Nemesis is his final novel.

By Jonathan Derbyshire

The American website Salon has picked up on an interview that Philip Roth gave to the French magazine Les Inrocks last month in which the novelist declared that his literary career is at an end. Asked if he still had the desire to write, Roth replied: “To be honest with you, I’m done. Nemesis [the novel Roth published in 2010] will be my last book.” Roth told the interviewer that he hadn’t written anything for three years and had spent his time instead arranging his archive for his biographer Blake Bailey, who wrote a well-received biography of John Cheever. “I don’t want to write my memoirs,” he said. “But I wanted my biographer to have material for his book before my death.” Roth continued:

At 74, I realised I didn’t have a lot of time left, so I decided to re-read the novels I’d loved when I was 20 or 30 … Dostoevsky, Turgenev, Conrad, Hemingway … And when I’d finished I decided to re-read all my own books, starting at the end with Nemesis … I wanted to see if I’d wasted my time writing. And I thought it’d been more or less a success … I did the best I could have done with what I had.

Nemesis was reviewed in the NS by Leo Robson. “Ever since Goodbye, Columbus,” Robson wrote, “Roth has projected, and instilled, a sense of absolute confidence; a half-century on, his gift looks disturbingly like a knack. Nemesis is a forceful, exacting, even word-perfect novel, but it is also unadventurous, familiar, a little otiose – a work beyond the powers of most novelists but well within his.”

Roth’s previous novel, The Humbling, was treated much more harshly by NS editor Jason Cowley: “The latest product to roll out of the Philip Roth fiction factory is an old man’s masturbatory fantasy which, wrapped in a smart dust jacket, the equivalent of the pornographer’s brown paper bag, purports to be a novella of late-middle-aged existential crisis – at least during its more serious moments.”

More on Philip Roth in the New Statesman:

Sign up for The New Statesman’s newsletters Tick the boxes of the newsletters you would like to receive. Quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics from the New Statesman's politics team. The New Statesman’s global affairs newsletter, every Monday and Friday. The best of the New Statesman, delivered to your inbox every weekday morning. The New Statesman’s weekly environment email on the politics, business and culture of the climate and nature crises - in your inbox every Thursday. A handy, three-minute glance at the week ahead in companies, markets, regulation and investment, landing in your inbox every Monday morning. Our weekly culture newsletter – from books and art to pop culture and memes – sent every Friday. A weekly round-up of some of the best articles featured in the most recent issue of the New Statesman, sent each Saturday. A newsletter showcasing the finest writing from the ideas section and the NS archive, covering political ideas, philosophy, criticism and intellectual history - sent every Wednesday. Sign up to receive information regarding NS events, subscription offers & product updates.
  • A S Byatt on Roth as “recorder of Darwinian Man”.
  • Frank Kermode declares, in a 2010 interview, that Roth is “writing some pretty bad books at the moment”.
  • Rick Gekoski, chair of the International Man Booker Prize in 2011, explains why the prize was given to Roth that year.

Content from our partners
How do we secure the hybrid office?
How materials innovation can help achieve net zero and level-up the UK
Fantastic mental well-being strategies and where to find them